Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for Edward Everett or search for Edward Everett in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
g-rule was promptly applied. Meanwhile, two incidents showed unmistakably the Southern purpose to make pro-slavery and national (or Federal) synonymous terms. One was the reluctance of the Senate, till the North showed its teeth, to confirm Edward Everett's Lib. 11.146, 149, 150, 154. nomination to the court of St. James, on account of his anti-slavery views. In response to the abolition catechism of 1837, Gov. Everett had professed his conviction that slavery was an evil, and should be abGov. Everett had professed his conviction that slavery was an evil, and should be abolished as soon as this could be done peacefully. He asserted the power of Congress over slavery and the slave trade in the District, and opposed the admission of any new slave State. Finally, such progress had he made within two years (ante, 2: 76), he maintained the right of free discussion (Lib. 7: 182). The other (for no game was too small for this inquisition) was the same body's refusal to confirm the postmaster of Philadelphia unless he discharged Joshua Coffin (newly appointed) from hi
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
ish island of New Providence, where they arrived Nov. 9. Nineteen of the ringleaders (including one Pompey Garrison) were arrested and held for mutiny and murder, the rest set free (Lib. 11: 206, 210; 12: 34, 37). All efforts to secure the extradition of the prisoners, or of their fellow-slaves, or to obtain indemnity from Great Britain, were futile, and the mutineers were ultimately discharged (Lib. 12: 42). Webster, as Secretary of State, conducted the diplomatic correspondence through Edward Everett at the court of St. James (Lib. 12: 34), prostituting his intellect in support of the Government's right to demand from the whole human race respect to the municipal law of Southern slavery—to use Channing's words in review of Webster, in his pamphlet on the Duty of the Free States (Lib. 12: 55, 57, 61, 65, 105). In the Senate, Calhoun led the furious Southern clamor for reparation or war (Lib. 11: 211; 12: 10). In the House, Joshua R. Giddings stood for the North in manly resolutions d