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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 11: (search)
great pleasure in each other's society. Mr. Agassiz took counsel of Mr. Ticknor many times, saying that the working of the Anglo-Saxon mind was full of valuable instruction for him; while the practical wisdom of his friend, individually, assisted him in settling questions, the solution of which did not lie in his department as a man of science. His bonhomie seems inexhaustible; and how much that does for a man under institutions and in a state of society like ours I need not tell . . . . . Everett is less and less satisfied with his position, As President of Harvard College. and I think cannot remain in it beyond next August. I feel confident he has done much good since he has been there. Write soon, and tell me what you, and other wise men think about the Trastono. Faithfully yours, George Ticknor. To George T. Curtis. Boston, April 22, 1848. my dear George,—. . . . We think and talk of little here except the French and foreign affairs. There are so many steamers
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
Chapter 13: Visit to Washington. letters to Mr. Milman, Prince John, Sir E. Head, Sir C. Lyell, F. Wolf, D. Webster, E. Everett, G. T. Curtis, and C. S. Daveis. New books.-passing events. Spanish literary subjects. slavery. international copyright. In the spring of the year 1850 Mr. Ticknor went to Washington hardly more hopeful. But I trust we are mistaken. I remain always very faithfully, my dear Prince, Your friend and servant, George Ticknor. To the Hon. Edward Everett. Manchester [Massachusetts], July 31, 1850. my dear Everett,—I have just read your oration of the 17th of June. I made an attempt in the Advertiser, Everett,—I have just read your oration of the 17th of June. I made an attempt in the Advertiser, but broke down from the obvious misplacing of some paragraphs, and I am glad I failed, for I have enjoyed it much more here in this quietness, reading the whole without getting up out of my chair, and then looking over certain parts of it again and again, till I had full possession of them. It was a great pleasure, and I thank you
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
Chapter 14: Letters. death of Mr. Webster. Crimean War. letters to C. S. Daveis, E. Everett, Sir E. Head, King John of Saxony, Sir C. Lyell. To C. S. Daveis, Portland. Boston, Oc moan. But we will talk of it all; I cannot write. Yours always, Geo. Ticknor. To Hon. Edward Everett, Washington. Boston, November 20, 1852. My dear Everett,—I have received two notes frEverett,—I have received two notes from you, and sundry packets of letters, etc., relating to Mr. Webster; but I have thought it better not to trouble you with answers. Everything, however, has no doubt come safely that you have sent. Mr. Everett, Mr. C. C. Felton, Mr. G. T. Curtis, and Mr. Ticknor were, by Mr. Webster's will, made his literary executors. With his usual promptness Mr. Ticknor began at once to collect, from allon more than any measure ever did. But it will not tend to increase the slave power . . . . Everett is quite ill, and has resigned his place in the Senate. . . . It is a misfortune for himself to
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
by the following letter, which he wrote to Mr. Everett, in the summer of 1851. A few months beforlishment of a public library. To Hon. Edward Everett. Bellows Falls, Vermont, July 14, 1851know how it strikes you. To this letter Mr. Everett replied as follows:— Cambridge, Julshould be appointed. When, therefore, both Mr. Everett and Mr. Ticknor—the latter greatly to his sairs was cordial and complete; and although Mr. Everett never fully believed in the practical benefmmittee of four to consider their work, and Mr. Everett and Mr. Ticknor were made a sub-committee twhile he never met with obstacles raised by Mr. Everett, who was loyal throughout, yet he was led, by this report,—drawn up by Mr. Ticknor and Mr. Everett,—because he saw the importance to his nativr establishing an agency. In a letter to Mr. Everett he gives an account of some of these earlier experiences. To Hon. E. Everett. Brussels, July 30, 1856, and Bonn, August 4. my dear [14 more.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 16: (search)
in my small way without thinking of it. I will therefore stop, only adding my love to Susan and Elizabeth and all about you. . . . . Yours always, G. T. To Hon. E. Everett. London, July 18, 1856. my dear Everett,—Thank you for your agreeable note of the 2d inst. I am very glad to hear such good news of the Library, and thath to put it off as long as they can. There were complaints about enlistments in the United States during the Crimean War. See ante, p. 295. . . . . To Hon. Edward Everett. Brussels, July 30, 1856. . . . . I began this letter at its date, at Brussels, but I was much crowded with work then, and now I finish it at Bonn. Ple I was at the Pertzes', and the consequence is that the entries are full of livery-servants, and the porte-cochere is garnished with a guard of honor. To Hon. E. Everett. parts of this letter have appeared in the preceding chapter. Berlin, September 20, 1856. . . . . Two evenings ago I was at Dr. Pertz's house, in a ver
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
Chapter 20: Letters, 1857-59, to Judge Curtis, Sir Edmund Head, Sir C. Lyell, Mr. R. H. Gardiner. letter from Baron Humboldt. letters to Mr. Everett, Hon. E. Twisleton, Sir W. C. Trevelyan. The following letter-which, being chiefly concerned with our national affairs, belongs rather in the present chapter than where its date would have placed it–is addressed to a person whose slight connection with this book is no indication of his position in Mr. Ticknor's esteem. Judge Curt of about five thousand handsomely bound volumes. The simplicity and upright intelligence of Mr. Dowse had always attracted Mr. Ticknor, and he often quoted the autobiographical utterance which he records at the end of this note. To Hon. E. Everett. Park Street, December 10, 1858. my dear Everett,—. . . If I had known that you intended to use Mr. Dowse's account of his youth to me in your most agreeable and interesting lecture last night, When Mr. Everett had delivered a eulogy
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
Chapter 21: Letters, 1859-61, to Sir C. Lyell, Hon. E. Everett, Sir E. Head, C. S. Daveis. To Sir Charles Lyell. Boston, May 17, 1859. My dear Lyell,—By the time this letter reaches London, I trust that you will be safely back in Harley Street, from the land of dikes and canals,—a strange country, which I visited once, and seemed to lead such a sort of amphibious existence, that I have never cared to go there again. But it was in the month of July, and the waters pumped up by the windmills did not give out Sabean odors. We feel very uncomfortable about the news we get from your side of the Atlantic . . . . But I had rather talk about the progress of civilization than its decay and death, which are, I conceive, the natural results of the prevalence of military governments. So I will tell you about Agassiz and his affairs. . . . . The establishment The Museum of Comparative Zoology at Cambridge. is a grand one, and I take an interest in it, not from any
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 22: (search)
etters in a day or two. Sir Henry Holland is somewhere in the United States,—his fifth visit, I think, within twenty years; certainly his fourth within a dozen. Why can't you and Sir Charles imitate him? . . . . He is to be here on Monday at Everett's, where I dine with him on Tuesday. The Prescotts are still all out of town, but Susan and Elizabeth come back in four or five days. They are all well, but I have as yet seen none of them. . . . . October 4.—Sir Henry Holland came in yests all no justification of civil war . . . . It is the unpardonable sin in a really free State. You will, perhaps, think me shabby if I stop without saying anything about the Trent affair, and so I may as well make a clean breast of it. Except Everett, all the persons hereabout in whose judgment I place confidence believed from the first that we had no case. I was fully of that mind. . . . . As to the complaint about our closing up harbors, we are not very anxious. It is a harsh measure,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
F. Bradford, Professor Louis Agassiz, Lady Cranworth. death of Mr. Everett. During the period of old age, upon which Mr. Ticknor had nowhat all four of us, meaning my wife, Anna, and Lizzie, shall go to Everett's to-night, a thing the like of which all of us have not done togert, what it is. The first portion of this report was drawn up by Mr. Everett, formerly our Minister in England, and our principal Secretary orly all those who were not destined to survive him. The death of Mr. Everett in January, 1865, was a shock from its extreme suddenness, and iy, on this lady-like or lover-like frequency of billets-doux. Mr. Everett was in the habit of preserving everything of this kind, and Mr. cter that they could be used in these volumes. On the day of Mr. Everett's death Mr. Ticknor wrote to Mr. G. T. Curtis:— Boston, t library, that when Winthrop came in my first impression was that Everett was entering the room. A minute afterwards I think I felt worse t
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Appendix A. (search)
urposes, and all my expectations, which are but few, although you may think they are many. . . . . You may imagine, by my writing to you so much and so frequently on the improvement of time, and on the economy of your expenses, that I am not only very much concerned, but that I am very solicitous about you. If you have any such idea as this, you are greatly mistaken. I have no fear, except for your health and happiness. If you suppose Professor Stuart and I expect too much from you and Everett, you and he should not write such flattering accounts to Dr. Kirkland and Savage, of the advantages which Gottingen possesses over Cambridge and other universities in this country. So long as you and he draw such strong comparisons, and tell us that the University of Gottingen possesses ten times the advantages, and that a student can progress ten times as fast under her auspices as one can under those of our universities, what must be the fair expectations of those to whom you two young g
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