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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 53 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for W. S. Everett or search for W. S. Everett in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
iment against disunion. The vote for presidential candidates in Georgia is a fair criterion of the sentiment in the State prior to the election of Mr. Lincoln. There were three electoral tickets: One for Breckinridge and Lane, one for Bell and Everett, one for Douglas and Johnson, but none for Lincoln and Hamlin. The vote stood as follows: Breckinridge and Lane, 51,893; Bell and Everett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced SouthEverett, 42,855; Douglas and Johnson, 11,580. As the Breckinridge ticket was favored by the most pronounced Southern rights men, the vote in Georgia showed a small majority against immediate secession by separate State action. But the election of Mr. Lincoln by a purely sectional vote set the current toward secession, causing the tide of disunion sentiment to rise with steadily increasing volume, and strengthening the views and fears of those who could see relief only by withdrawing from a union which had fallen under the control of a party favoring a policy so antagonistic to the rights and interests o
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
, Col. I. W. Avery. Brigadier-General Forrest's cavalry corps contained the First Georgia, Col. J. J. Morrison, and Sixth, Col. John R. Hart, in H. B. Davidson's brigade of Pegram's division. Company G, Second cavalry, Capt. Thomas M. Merritt, had the post of escort for General Cheatham. Scogin's Georgia battery was attached to Melanethon Smith's battalion; Capt. Evan P. Howell's battery to Walker's division; Dawson's battery, Lieut. R W. Anderson, and Company E, Ninth battalion, Lieut. W. S. Everett, to Stewart's division. The batteries of Capts. Tyler M. Peeples and Andrew M. Wolihin came with Leyden's battalion from east Tennessee, and in the reserve artillery under Maj. F. H. Robertson, were the Georgia batteries of Capts. M. W. Havis and T. L. Massenburg. The Federal army which appeared before Bragg at Chattanooga was commanded by Maj.-Gen. W. S. Rosecrans, who had gained fame by spirited fighting in West Virginia, by his desperate defense of Corinth against Van Dom, and