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The Daily Dispatch: August 21, 1861., [Electronic resource], Contributions for the sick and wounded (search)
dvance against the left flank of the enemy was not made, because orders which were sent by General Beauregard to General Jones were not received by the latter. He, without intention, committed an error in mentioning Gen. Jones' name instead of Gen Ewell's. Gen. Jones did receive orders from Gen. Beauregard to cross Bull Run at McLean's Ford, for the purpose of attacking the enemy upon their left flank, and did actually cross the Run twice on the 21st for that purpose. It was Gen Ewell to whomGen Ewell to whom orders were sent to co-operate with Gen. Jones, who, it is said, did not receive the orders — a melancholy fact, indeed — which compelled Gen. Jones, between 3 and 4 o'clock in the evening, with some 1,800 efficient men, to attack their batteries on the hill, near Blackberry Ford, protected by at least five thousand infantry and a considerable force of cavalry. This attack, made at a moment when their right was already giving way, succeeded in dislodging the enemy, though Gen. Jones' command
Order from Gen Ewell. The following is the General Order of Gen. Ewell asking the officers and Chaplains of his command to return thanks to the Almighty for the victory gained at Winchester: Headq'rs 2d Corps June 13, 1863. General Orders No. 41 The Lieut Gen. Commanding asks the men and officers of the corps to unite with him in returning thanks to our Heavenly Father for the signal success with which He has crowned the valor of this command. In acknowledgment of Divine Gen. Ewell asking the officers and Chaplains of his command to return thanks to the Almighty for the victory gained at Winchester: Headq'rs 2d Corps June 13, 1863. General Orders No. 41 The Lieut Gen. Commanding asks the men and officers of the corps to unite with him in returning thanks to our Heavenly Father for the signal success with which He has crowned the valor of this command. In acknowledgment of Divine favor, Chaplains will hold religious services in their respective regiments at such times as may be most convenient. With wonderfully small loss — less than 300 killed, wounded, and missing--we have carried strong works defended by an abundance of superior artillery, capturing over 3,000 prisoners, and large quantities of military stores and supplies. Such a result should strengthen the reliance in the righteousness of our cause which has inspired every effort of our troops. By command of (
at South Mountain. The last dispatch from Pittsburg states that the citizen en masse had turned out and were throwing up entrenchments around the city. --The dispatch concludes by saying that the city is perfectly safe. Movements of a Gen. Ewell's rebel Corps. Baltimore, June 24, 1220 A. M. --Information received at the headquarters of General Schenck to-night, and other sources, state that Gen Ewell's forces to the number of 35,000 to 40,000 men, are now in Maryland, in the BGen Ewell's forces to the number of 35,000 to 40,000 men, are now in Maryland, in the Boonsboro' Valley. They have a large quantity of artillery, cavalry, and infantry. They are building bridges across the canal and are actively engaged foraging the country, collecting supplies, &c. They crossed at Antietam Ford and Shepherdstown. Gen. Kelley telegraphs that Imboden's cavalry, about 2,000 strong, are at Big Cacapon. Harrisburg, June 23, 7 P. M.--More startling intelligence has just reached me. A gentleman who came up on the train from Carlisle reports our forces
. This makes two corps which are supposed to have crossed at Shepperdstown Ford. When Gen. Rodes's division, of Ewell's corps, arrived at Chambersburg, the operator was unable to escape. He remained until Wednesday; when he made his escaptry which they now occupy. Two rebel cavalry, taken yesterday near Chambersburg, report the rebels advancing under Gen Ewell into Pennsylvania with 28 regiments of infantry, 5,000 cavalry, and 20 pieces of artillery, chiefly heavy guns, and thaterday. All gone into Pennsylvania. General Lee and staff are on this side of the river. A proclamation from Gen. Ewell The Herald publishes the following proclamation from Gen. Ewell: Headq'rs second corps army ofNorthern VirginiaGen. Ewell: Headq'rs second corps army ofNorthern Virginia, Chambersburg, Pa., June 22, 63. 1st. The sale of intoxicating liquors to this command, without a written permission from a Major General, is strictly prohibited. 2d. Persons having liquor in their possession are required to report t
Our army Correspondence. Madison C. H., Va., July 28, 1863. Having been on the march with Ewell's corp since Thursday, the 23d, I have had no opportunity of communicating with you, and no means of forwarding a letter had the opportunity of fight at Manassas Gap, on the afternoon of the 23d, the day we left Winchester. Generals Longstreet and Hill preceded Gen. Ewell, and passing through Chester's Gap, in the Blue Ridge, Wright's brigade, of Anderson's division, was detached by Gen. Hill, and left to guard the pass until Gen Ewell, who was in the rear, should have sufficient time to come up, cross the river at Front Royal, proceed without interruption down the Valley and cross the mountains at a point lower down. Not long afterack gradually, and did so in good order. The timely arrival of General Rodes, with his splendid division, the advance of Ewell's corps, changed the fortune of the day and put a speedy end to the conflict. Although Wright's brigade, even falling ba
Anderson's division, of Hill's corps, marched down the same road, followed an hour or two later by Johnson's division, of Ewell's corps, which had retraced its steps from Shippensburg. In the course of the morning orders came for Longstreet's corps, except Pickett's division, left behind at Chambersburg, to follow on in the same direction, as soon as General Ewell's train, sent back from Carline, should pass — This was an immense train, as long almost as the tail of a comet, and far more ominivisions alone were in position to engage the enemy's column on the morning of the 1st. Early's and Rodes's divisions of Ewell's corps arrived on the ground late in the afternoon, having marched down the Susquehanna from Carlisle to York, and thencied, and from which we subsequently found it impossible to dislodge him.--The same result would probably have followed if Ewell's train had have turned out on the side of the road, and Longstreet's corps allowed to move rapidly to the front, or if t
shall necessarily have to treat of the movements and doings of the troops engaged by corps. Ewell's Corps.--Rodes crossed the Potomac on the 15th and 16th at Williamsport. Johnson crossed the rtion of the achievements of each department of the army. Rodes's and Johnson's divisions of Ewell's corps marched on the same road to Shippensburg. From Shippensburg they moved by two parallel the 25th of June. On the 29th Brig.-Gen. Jenkins and command, accompanied by Capt. Richardson Gen. Ewell's Engineer, went within sight and artillery range of Harrisburg, Pa., and reconnoitered the defences of the city, with the view on the part of Gen Ewell of attacking the place the next day with his whole corps. The next day, as Gen. Ewell was preparing to march to Harrisburg, twenty miles diGen. Ewell was preparing to march to Harrisburg, twenty miles distant, an order came to him to unite his corps with the rest of the army at Cashtown, near Gettysburg. Major Gen. Early, of this corps, who, after crossing the river, had moved to York, and who was t
The Daily Dispatch: March 19, 1864., [Electronic resource], Pennsylvania campaign--second day at Gettysburg. (search)
ern Virginia, March 18th, 1864. In two previous letters I have adverted to the parts which Ewell's corps, and Heth and Pender, of Hill's corps, bore in the first day's fight at Gettysburg. To-he Emmittsburg road on the enemy's left. The enemy having been driven back by the corps of Lieuts Gen Ewell and Hill on the first day, had taken up a strong position extending from Cemetery hill alonled or wounded in this evening's engagement. The line of battle on this day was formed with Ewell on the extreme left, and Longstreet on the extreme right, with A. P. Hill in the centre. We havand imperfectly alluded to the battle as fought on the right; let us now look after the enemy on Ewell's front, and see how he has disposed of them. All was ready on this end of the line to attack ato bear on the line of Rodes's advance. When the second day closed this was the position of Ewell's corps. Johnson's left had gained important ground, part of it being a very short distance fro
The Daily Dispatch: May 10, 1864., [Electronic resource], The movement on Richmond--two more Repulses of the enemy by Gen Lee — affairs on the Southside — feint at Drewry's Bluff — fight expected near Petersburg Today — the Central Railroad Tapped, &c, &c. (search)
ss from Germanna ford towards the plank road Gen Ewell's corps, which was moving down the turnpike . Whilst matters were thus progressing on Ewell's front the enemy in heavy force advanced to an this part of the line as well as in front of Ewell. During the night Lane's pickets succeeded innded who fell into our hands. Gen Johnson, of Ewell's corps, also captured during this evening's fto us, especially along Ewell's lines. Indeed Ewell, who is always up to time and in action coverelines of battle, and fought most obstinately. Ewell's boys, and especially Early's, remembering thround. One advance upon and reconnaissance of Ewell's position, which was strongly fortified, seemft wing. Simultaneously with the advance upon Ewell's lines, the enemy also made a move against ouenemy's sharpshooters whilst reconnoitering on Ewell's front on Friday morning. One of the staeavy cannonading was heard in the direction of Ewell's lines. List of casualties The follo[5 more...]
the enemy's. One of our Captains states that he rode, eight hundred yards over the field on Wednesday, the 11th instant, and that he believes he saw five hundred dead Yankees, and that he was informed that the Yankee dead lay much thicker where Gen Ewell fought. We understand that Gen Ewell puts the enemy's loss up to Tuesday at forty thousand in killed, wounded, prisoners, and missing. Prisoners are continually arriving at Orange C. H., some of them humble, but most of them impudent. OnGen Ewell puts the enemy's loss up to Tuesday at forty thousand in killed, wounded, prisoners, and missing. Prisoners are continually arriving at Orange C. H., some of them humble, but most of them impudent. Only two negro soldiers have yet reached Orange C. in uniform. One of them said but little. The other, a cavalryman, was somewhat more --said he was unhorsed at the first fire; that he had made the discovery that he was unfit for the duties of a soldier, and expressed a desire to return to picking cotton, in which very rea desire we sincerely trust his negro ship may be gratified. Many of the Yankee troops who stormed our fortifications came tumbling over the works, cursing and abu
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