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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 60 0 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
am's brigade, stationed at Fairfax, met the first aggressive movement of General McDowell's army, and was attacked early in the morning. By General Beauregard's orders Bonham retired through Centreville, and took the position assigned him behind Mitchell's ford, on Bull run. The Confederate army was in position behind Bull run, extending from Union Mills ford on the right to the stone bridge on the left, a distance of 5 miles. The brigades were stationed, from right to left, as follows: Ewell, D. R. Jones, Longstreet, Bonham, Cocke, and Evans on the extreme left. Early was in reserve, in rear of the right. To each brigade a section or a battery of artillery was attached, except in the case of Bonham who had two batteries and six companies of cavalry attached to his command. Seven other cavalry companies were distributed among the other brigades. Bonham's position was behind Mitchell's ford, with his four regiments of Carolinians; Jenkins' Fifth regiment was with General Jone
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
the field and the woods swept by the gunboat batteries. Jackson sent D. H. Hill and Whiting forward, in order, and supported them with brigades from his own and Ewell's division, and they met a bloody repulse; but they did not make the attack until after Magruder's and Huger's brigades had been successively repulsed, some of theake opened fire upon him. At this crisis he ordered the whole brigade to retire and reform further to the right. While reforming on the Second South Carolina, General Ewell called him to support immediately a brigade he was about to lead against the enemy's battery, and was so urgent, that without waiting for the rest of his brigade, he led the Second in support of Ewell's gallant and useless charge, and with this affair, night having fully come, Kershaw's brigade had done the part assigned to it at Malvern hill. The long march to this point, after the battle of Savage Station, with its losses, had reduced the strength of the brigade. Kershaw took into th
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
ard, and formed in line of battle facing the enemy, who had during the evening been fighting General Ewell near Bristoe Station. Standing under arms here we had a fine view of the magnificent conflatook this position, brisk firing was heard upon the right, where the divisions of Taliaferro and Ewell were thrown by Jackson against the column of Pope's army coming up the Warrenton pike, expecting to find Jackson at Centreville. A severe engagement followed, the battle of Groveton, in which Ewell and Taliaferro were both wounded. About dark Gregg's brigade was hurried to the scene of action I shall follow the official reports and Mr. Caldwell's history. after sleeping on their arms on Ewell's battlefield, had returned to their first position on the left at early dawn of the 29th, and wed by Hill's division, and a severe battle followed until night. During the battle a portion of Ewell's division, commanded by Lawton, supported General Hill, but the battle was mainly fought by Hi
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
, commanded by Lieutenant-Generals Longstreet, Ewell and A. P. Hill. Longstreet's division commanders were McLaws, Pickett and Hood; Ewell's, Early, Rodes and Johnson; A. P. Hill's, Anderson, Heth orced the line of the First. At this juncture Ewell's two divisions came in on Hill's left, and ththe right. The combined assault of Pender and Ewell's divisions swept the hill and routed the twothe Confederate general serious pause. He had Ewell's corps on his left, confronting Culp's and Cen. Edward Johnson said it was dark) before General Ewell's left division moved to the attack on Culision on Cemetery hill. The Third division of Ewell's corps (Rodes') did not attack at all. Anders hill until dusk, according to his own and General Ewell's statements. General Early, with two of my would be so shaken that both Longstreet and Ewell could attack with good hope of success, and Leface of his enemy on the morning of the 14th. Ewell's corps forded the river at Williamsport, Gene[5 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
y's and Germanna fords. Two corps of this army moved to oppose Him—Ewell's by the old turnpike, and Hill's by the plank road. . . . . A strong attack was made upon Ewell, who repulsed it. . . . . The enemy subsequently concentrated upon General Hill, who, with Heth's and Wilcox's divisions, successfully resisted repeated and despere changed from day to day, and a part of Kershaw's command fought with success on the 8th, at one time using the bayonet. Repeated and heavy assaults were made on Ewell's corps during the 10th, and on the 11th the two armies confronted each other at Spottsylvania Court House, ready for the awful battle of the 12th of May. The gioned far out on the Confederate right, was summoned to action about sunrise, May 12th, and after a march of two miles to the left, was moved at double-quick along Ewell's line. General Rodes, seeing them approach, asked: What troops are these? and was answered, McGowan's South Carolina brigade. There are no better soldiers in t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
ion. He was promoted major-general, and after participating in the Petersburg battles was ordered to the support of Early in the Shenandoah valley. In September he was ordered back to Richmond, and while on the way Early was defeated at Winchester. Then returning to the valley he opened the attack at Cedar Creek, with great success. After this, until the fall of Richmond, he served before that city, .north of the James. His last battle was Sailor's Creek, where he was captured with General Ewell and the greater part of the remnant of his command. As a prisoner of war he was held at Fort Warren, Boston, until August 12, 1865. On his return to South Carolina he again took up the practice of law, and in the same year was elected to the State senate and made president of that body. In 1874 he was the Democratic candidate for Congress in his district, and three years later was elected to the position of judge of the Fifth circuit. He served upon the bench until 1893, when he resi
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
omoted lieutenant and was later made assistant surgeon of Kershaw's brigade. He served in many of the battles of the four years struggle and was once slightly wounded. He was married, November 27, 1860, to Sarah Ewell Black, the daughter of William Ewell and Nancy Hunter (Dunlap) Black, whose grandfather, William Dunlap, was a major in the Revolutionary war. After the war Dr. Dunlap gave his attention to the practice of his profession and to farming until his death, February 28, 1879. The wisville, crossing of Tennessee river in 1863, Bean's Station, Knoxville, Warrenton Springs, Spottsylvania Court House, Howlett House, Bermuda Hundred, and the fighting on the Petersburg lines. On the retreat to Appomattox he was captured with General Ewell at Sailor's Creek, and subsequently was confined at Johnson's island until July, 1865. Lieutenant Gilbert was distinguished for modesty as well as valor. He could have been made captain of the battery had he wished, but he would not ask the