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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 347 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 317 55 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 268 46 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 147 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 145 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 140 16 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 134 58 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 129 13 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 123 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for Ewell or search for Ewell in all documents.

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communication with Europe; exchequer we had none; our opponents could raise millions at home or abroad; our leaders were few, of inferior rank and little reputation; our foes had one at their head fondly called by themselves the greatest general of his age. Save Lee, Johnston, Beauregard, and Cooper, we had riot one single officer of note; and the first-named was only a colonel of dragoons in the old United States service. It is true that several officers (among them Van Dorn, Longstreet, Ewell, and Evans) in the Indian countries, or on the Border, immediately threw up their commands, and joined the fortunes of their respective States; but little was expected of them, since they could only be regarded as men of theory, with but little experience in warfare. Common expectation, however, was most agreeably disappointed in these officers. While General Scott and a host of officers were drilling and marshalling their men at Washington, the State of Virginia seceded. Her arsenals
only said to be promising. General Lee was at Richmond, acting as Secretary of War; General Cooper was there also as adjutant-general; Bragg and Polk were in Tennessee, and Johnston in the Valley; Beauregard was alone at Manassas, having Evans, Ewell, Longstreet, and a few less known names, as subordinates in the approaching struggle. Of Beauregard I knew little, but had heard much. He was continually moving about from place to place, his appearance and escort being so unostentatious thaor us — a supposition that was strongly confirmed when not less than seven guns of the Washington Corps were detailed for our support. From our position to Blackburn's Ford was half a mile, and there Longstreet was posted with a strong brigade. Ewell was to our right, lower down, and across the Run at Union Mills. While we stood in line of battle, scouts came in, reporting the enemy's approach en masse. In the afternoon an Alabama regiment came in, in good order, bringing all its baggage. T
informed comrade, I ascertained the precise position and number of our forces. Ewell's brigade constituted our extreme right, and was across Bull Run, posted at Uniof a forward movement on the right, hoping that it might serve as a diversion. Ewell and Jones were ordered to move into position and attack. The latter general mar remaining three hours, Jones retired south of the Run. It has been said that Ewell never received these orders. Be this as it may, Ewell, Jones, and Longstreet Ewell, Jones, and Longstreet remained idle with their magnificent commands, while the roar of battle to the left was increasing every moment. In the distance shot and shell were ploughing up th, couriers were sent to our right, with instructions for Longstreet, Jones, and Ewell to make a strong demonstration towards Centreville. The roar of cannon and muslds. To add to their horror, Jones's brigade on the right, without waiting for Ewell or Longstreet, attacked their reserves on Centreville, and turned what would ha
boats gave their final shellings. A great move was evidently preparing by both parties, but few could guess its object. Banks and others at Harper's Ferry were in great force, and were beginning to move up the Shenandoah slowly and cautiously. General ( Stonewall ) Jackson had been detached from Manassas before Christmas, with about three thousand men, which, together with those already in the valley, might make a total of ten thousand, but certainly not more. He was ably seconded by Generals Ewell and Ashby, and no three men in the Confederacy knew the country better. Although their force was small, and that of the enemy large, they unexpectedly appeared and disappeared like phantoms before Banks and Shields, acting like Jack-o‘--lanterns to draw them on to destruction. Our position on the Upper Potomac at Leesburgh was also threatened at not less than four points, namely, westward, from Lovettsville and Harper's Ferry; northward, from Point of Rocks; eastward, from Edwards's
at Manassas by that old Stirling man, McDowell. I knew some of the McDowells in Scotland, and good people they were. Beauregard is a good officer, and all he wants is a little Scotch blood in him to make a first-rate strategist. But we all know that had old Mac followed us up vigorously after passing Sudley Ford, we should never have been here now, I'm thinking, drinking bad whisky, at four o'clock oa the morning. Why, man, our right wing was never engaged at all. Longstreet, Jones, and Ewell hardly fired a shot all day; and there was the left overlapped by the Yankees at three in the afternoon, and when we did drive them back, and got them into a panic, Beauregard hadn't more than two regiments at their heels. Old Evans, at Leesburgh, did the thing handsomely; he killed more than the number of his own men actually engaged; made prisoners of twice as many, and drowned the rest. I hear he came from Fife before entering the Northern army. Yes, dear old Scotland has given a good
e than a few hours. At McGackeysville we found that Ewell, with a force of ten thousand men, had crossed the B and that Shields threatened to annihilate Jackson, Ewell had wisely crossed the Ridge and hastened to our assson, finding his original command fully rested, left Ewell's force of ten thousand at McGackeysville, and salliceeded onwards to Newmarket, and was there joined by Ewell's force of ten thousand, which had been awaiting us en, on the morning of May twenty-second, Jackson and Ewell, with fourteen thousand men, were meditating an attack on their rear. To make all sure, Ewell was detached with ten thousand men to seize Winchester, the enemythe flanks, and seize the baggage. With this object Ewell started northwards, and we southwards, towards Fronteat-by the Valley Pike-and that was held by us; with Ewell marching rapidly towards Winchester to seize the for camped at Newtown, a few miles from Winchester. Ewell had not been able to get into Winchester before Bank
ers in the service, and was second only to Scott in the estimation and love of the people. Albert Sydney Johnston stood perhaps higher as an active commander, but few, if any, surpassed him in a thorough knowledge of his profession, or greater ability in council. His property and effects were in Northern hands; he was offered chief command in the field; but he abandoned all, and, bereft of every thing, offered himself to his native State. Johnston, Beauregard, Van Dorn, Evans, Longstreet, Ewell, and a host of others, made similar sacrifices, and for a long time were without any settled rank or command. They had to fight their way up, and have successfully done so. The same may be said of the navy. Lynch, Tatnall, Ingraham, Hollins, and others, followed their illustrious example. Maury — the world-renowed Maury-had all to lose and nothing to gain by joining our cause; but he did so, and refusing the offers and hospitalities of kings and princes, busied himself, industriously, in
ndly that he would never serve with them again; for although he had been urging them forward the whole day, and personally leading, he could make nothing of them. Finding that the enemy's infantry were near at hand, Ashby sent information to Ewell, who soon countermarched three regiments, and made dispositions for attack. The enemy deployed their men right and left of the road, and advancing through the woods some distance without opposition, commenced cheering lustily. Several open fiel fire. Here Ashby drew up his men, and remained beneath their fire, and waited for reenforcements from Jackson. We took forty-four prisoners-among them the colonel commanding the brigade of cavalry. The infantry having arrived, Generals Ashby, Ewell, and Stewart (of Maryland) led them to the fight. Here Ashby's gallantry could not have been excelled. Having led the First Maryland regiment in a charge, which sent the enemy flying from that quarter, he sought the Fifty-eighth Virginia, and s
military history. Just look at the entire arrangement. When our main army fell back from Fredericksburgh, the Rappahannock, and Rapidan, and went to Yorktown to meet McClellan, Fredericksburgh was threatened by a large division under McDowell: Ewell was deputed to watch him, and did it well; but in the Valley there were not less than three army corps coming up to form a grand army to advance on Richmond from the west. Jackson was at Winchester with a small force, and was ordered to attack Shields, (Banks being sick,) so as to create a diversion in our favor. Although obliged to retire after the battle of Kearnstown, Jackson called on Ewell, and, receiving reenforcements from him, suddenly pounced down on Banks at Front Royal, and chased him to Washington, capturing immense quantities of baggage and thousands of prisoners. He retired again, and, recruited, rushed down the Valley, and instead of allowing Shields and Fremont to join McDowell, beat them both in detail, and obliged
ur right, handled his men with more than usual ability, and prevented this design being executed. Prisoners captured informed us of the commands they severally belonged to; from whom it appeared that Heintzelman was moving against our left under Ewell near Centreville; Sigel was operating against the centre under Jackson; and Porter, with his regulars and powerful artillery, was opposed to Hill, McDowell being in reserve. Banks was not mentioned, and his position was unknown. This news confilding on like grim death to his position on our left, and punishing the enemy frightfully with his well-disposed artillery. Thus, in truth, all our generals were hotly engaged at different points of the line. The impetuous Ambrose Hill was with Ewell and others under Jackson, and had enough to do to keep time with the rapid movements of their chief. The satirical; stoical D. H. Hill was there, cold as ice, and firm as a rock. Evans, Stuart, McLaws, Maxey Gregg, Jenkins, Barksdale, Whiting,