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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 347 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 317 55 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 268 46 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 147 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 145 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 140 16 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 134 58 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 129 13 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 123 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Ewell or search for Ewell in all documents.

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and also to give us possession of a direct road to Cold Harbor. Hawe's Shop remained in our possession finally, for late in the evening Custer's brigade was dismounted and formed in close column in rear of Gregg, and while it assaulted through an opening near the centre of his line, the other two brigades advanced and carried the temporary works. The enemy's dead and many of his wounded fell into our hands; also a considerable number of prisoners, from whom we learned that Longstreet's and Ewell's corps were but four miles to the rear. The battle was a decidedly severe one, the loss on each side being heavy in proportion to the number of troops engaged. This fight took place almost immediately in front of our infantry, which, during the latter part of the contest, was busily occupied in throwing up intrenchments. Late in the afternoon I reported to General Meade the presence of the enemy's infantry, and likewise that Hampton's and Fitzhugh Lee's divisions were in my front also
he station; and after destroying the railroad to some extent toward Gordonsville, I went into camp. From prisoners taken during the day, I gathered that General Hunter, instead of coming toward Charlottesville, as I had reason to expect, both from the instructions given me and the directions sent him be General Grant, was in the neighborhood of Lexington-apparently moving on Lynchburg-and that Breckenridge was at Gordonsville and Charlottesville. I also heard, from the same source, that Ewell's corps was on its way to Lynchburg, but this intelligence proved afterward to be incorrect, for these troops, commanded by General Early, did not leave Richmond till two days later. There was no doubt as to the information about Hunter's general location, however. He was marching toward Lynchburg, away from instead of toward me, thus making the junction of our commands beyond all reasonable probability. So in view of this, I made up my mind to abandon that part of the scheme, and to r
ity of Lynchburg to the Kanawha Valley. This route of march uncovered the lower portion of the Valley of the Shenandoah, and with the exception of a small force of Union troops under General Franz Sigel posted at Martinsburg for the purpose of covering the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, there was nothing at hand to defend the lower valley. The different bodies of Confederates which compelled Hunter's retreat were under command of General Jubal A. Early, who had been sent to Lynchburg with Ewell's corps after the defeat of the Confederate General W. C. Jones near Staunton on the 5th of June, to take command of the Valley District. When Early had forced Hunter into the Kanawha region far enough to feel assured that Lynchburg could not again be threatened from that direction, he united to his own corps General John C. Breckenridge's infantry division and the cavalry of Generals J. H. Vaughn, John McCausland, B. T. Johnson, and J. D. Imboden, which heretofore had been operating in so
s Station, a corps of Confederate infantry under General Ewell, composed of Anderson's, Kershaw's, and Custis Lle road, had meanwhile broken in between the rear of Ewell's column and the head of Gordon's, forcing Gordon to by General Humphreys. The complete isolation of Ewell from Longstreet in his front and Gordon in his rear , were no less eager and determined. The capture of Ewell, with six of his generals and most of his troops, crlanted himself square across the road. This blocked Ewell, who, advancing Anderson to some high ground west ofantime I had sent for — to come upon the ground, and Ewell, still contending with the cavalry, found himself suing Kershaw with Commander Tucker's Marine brigade. Ewell's skirmishers held the line of Sailor's Creek, whichbarricades and made his way back to my front through Ewell's line. Richardson had told me just how the main bod not until after they had almost gained the creek. Ewell was now hemmed in on every side, and all those under
hapter VIII Lincoln's laconic despatch capturing Lee's supplies delighted Engineers the Confederates' last effort a flag of truce General Geary's last ditch absurdity meeting of Grant and Lee the surrender estimate of General Grant. The first report of the battle of Sailor's Creek that General Grant received was, as already stated, an oral message carried by Colonel Price, of my staff. Near midnight I sent a despatch giving the names of the generals captured. These were Ewell, Kershaw, Barton, Corse, Dubose, and Custis Lee. In the same despatch I wrote: If the thing is pressed, I think that Lee will surrender. When Mr. Lincoln, at City Point, received this word from General Grant, who was transmitting every item of news to the President, he telegraphed Grant the laconic message: Let the thing be pressed. The morning of the 7th we moved out at a very early hour, Crook's division marching toward Farmville in direct pursuit, while Merritt and Mackenzie were ordere