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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 347 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 317 55 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 268 46 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 147 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 145 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 140 16 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 134 58 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 129 13 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 123 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ewell or search for Ewell in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 4 document sections:

inia, who was in command; one surgeon, one major, two captains, several lieutenants, and nearly five hundred privates. They mostly belonged to the Twelfth Virginia, Thirteenth North-Carolina, and Ninth Alabama, and were skirmishers selected from Ewell's corps. We lost in killed and wounded about thirty-five; the enemy I should think the same. As Captain Maynard, Commissary of Subsistence, was giving a drink to a wounded rebel, he was hit by a stray ball, and died next morning. This and ths. On the north side is a strong fort, two redoubts, and several rifle-pits. These were protected by a force of nearly two thousand men, and a battery of guns, in command of Colonel Godwin, of the Fifty-fourth North-Carolina. They were part of Ewell's corps, Early's division. It was about three o'clock when the head of the column neared the station. A heavy line of skirmishers and sharp-shooters was thrown out to cover the advance of our batteries. There is a commanding position to the re
ck, Maryland. Lee's army was supposed to be advancing against Harrisburgh, which was garrisoned by raw militia, upon which little or no reliance could be placed. Ewell's corps was on the west side of the Susquehanna, between that place and Columbia. Longstreet's corps was near Chambersburgh, and Hill's corps between that place aadsworth's division had driven back the enemy some distance, and captured a large number of prisoners, when General Reynolds fell mortally wounded. The arrival of Ewell's corps, about this time, by the York and Harrisburgh roads, compelled General Howard, upon whom the command devolved, to withdraw his force, the First and Eleventudgment, formed of the variety of meagre and conflicting testimony, is, that Lee's army has been reduced by Longstreet's corps, and perhaps, by some regiments from Ewell's and Hill's. As soon as I received General Rosecrans's and General Foster's telegrams, of the twelfth and thirteenth, I sent the following telegrams to General
s were picked up by our advance, and from them we learned that Hill's corps (rebel) had advanced from Orange Court-House down the plank-road, and there united with Ewell's corps, thereby concentrating the whole of Lee's army in a position naturally strong, and with formidable intrenchments to protect him. To add to our numerous and most probably in the vicinity of the Chancellorsville battle-ground. On Friday, about ten o'clock, skirmishers from Johnson's division, which was the head of Ewell's column, came up with the enemy, who were advancing up the road leading from the Fredericksburgh turnpike to Raccoon Ford, about a mile below Bartley's Mill, in Sng, but not raining. There has been no cannonading, but parties from the front gave it as their opinion that a battle will occur to-day or to-morrow. Lieutenant-General Ewell, who has been absent from the army for two weeks or more, passed Orange Court-House this morning, on his way to the army to resume the command of his cor
evolved on General Howard, of the Eleventh corps, who maintained his position till about two o'clock P. M., when the enemy was heavily reenforced by the arrival of Ewell's corps. The battle now raged fearfully between Hill's and Ewell's corps on one side, and the First and Eleventh corps on the other, till about four P. M., when GEwell's corps on one side, and the First and Eleventh corps on the other, till about four P. M., when General Howard was compelled to yield to the superior numbers of the enemy and fall back, losing many prisoners — nearly four thousand--to the south side of Gettysburgh. His position was eminently critical, when, to the great relief of both the General and our valiant troops, a division of the Third corps, under the immediate command which Sickles occupied, and which both generals evidently regarded as of the highest importance. While this terrific combat was raging on our left, Lee ordered Ewell to attack our right wing, and Hill to threaten our centre, both with the object, as he says in his report, to divert reenforcements from reaching our left, which,