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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 347 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 317 55 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 268 46 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 147 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 145 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 140 16 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 134 58 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 129 13 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 123 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Ewell or search for Ewell in all documents.

Your search returned 55 results in 16 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Correspondence of Hon. George W. Campbell, of Tennessee--original letters from distinguished men. (search)
Correspondence of Hon. George W. Campbell, of Tennessee--original letters from distinguished men. [Through the kindness of our old friend, Colonel Campbell Brown, of Tennessee, who was widely known as a gallant officer on General Ewell's staff, we have received a number of original letters of the correspondence of his distinguished ancestor, Governor George W. Campbell. We propose to publish such as have never been in print, and are of historic interest.] Letters from General Jackson. camp Craigs, April 13th, 1804. Dear Sir,--Having a direct opportunity for the conveyance of a letter to Knoxville, I embrace it to address a few lines to you. The opportunity is extremely grateful to me, as I had not the pleasure of having that conversation that I wished yesterday when we met on the road. Acts of disinterested friendship always leave a lasting impression upon my mind, and always remembered with the liveliest emotions of gratitude by me. Your disinterested friendship to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia, or the boys in gray, as I saw them from Harper's Ferry in 1861 to Appomattox Court-house in 1865. (search)
eld.] Paper no. 1. Early days of the war. It was my proud privilege to follow the fortunes of the Army of Northern Virginia, from Harper's Ferry, in 1861, to Appomattox Court-house, in 1865. Entering the service as high private in the rear rank, and afterward acting as chaplain in both Stonewall Jackson's and A. P. Hill's corps, I had some peculiar facilities for seeing and knowing what occurred. Personally acquainted with Robert E. Lee, J. E. Johnston, Beaureguard, Jackson, Stuart, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Early, Edward Johnson, Rodes, Pender, Heth, Wilcox, Hampton, Fitzhugh Lee, W. H. F. Lee, John B. Gordon, Pegram, J. A. Walker, and a large number of others of our leading officers, I at the same time made it my duty to know thoroughly the unknown private of the rank and file. I marched with him along the weary road; I bivouaced with him in the pelting storm; I shared with him the rough delights of the camp; I joined with him in those delightful services which proved that Jesus
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Summer campaign of 1863-report of General W. E. Jones. (search)
flushed with victory. The fruits were many killed and wounded, among the latter Major Starr, commanding, and one hundred and eighty-four (184) prisoners taken. It is believed in open country a bold charge of cavalry will in all cases whip a line of skirmishers, and such attacks would soon reduce the Federal cavalry to its former relative standing. The evening of the 4th of July, when it was reported the enemy were advancing in force on the Emmettsburg and Waynesboro road, I saw that General Ewell's train, then on its way to Williamsport, was in danger and asked to go with my command to its protection. I was allowed the Sixth and Seventh regiments and Chew's battery, but the Seventh was afterwards ordered back and Colonel Ferrabee's regiment (Fifty-ninth North Carolina) allowed to take its place, the latter being then on this road. This narrow and difficult way, rendered doubly so by heavy rain just fallen, was so blocked by wagons as to render it wholly impracticable to push ah
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Field letters from Headquarters Second corps A. N. V. (search)
ime can you be up? If you can't cross tonight the bridge will be taken up and sent back by way of Cedarville to Strasburg, to go with you, and be put down above where you cross the river. Send me word by courier — to ride rapidly — by what hour you will be here or whether you go by Strasburg. I am, General, yours, &c., (Signed) A. S. Pendleton, A. A. G. General Early. I will send another courier in an hour. Headquarters Second army corps, August 1, 1863. General,--Lieutenant-General Ewell directs me to send the following extract from a letter just received from General Lee, and to request that you examine the ground referred to and report as soon as possible: The engineers report a good line for us to take about one and a half miles from Orange Courthouse, in the direction of the Rapidan, on the hills ranging between the headwaters of the streams flowing into the Pamunky river and of the streams flowing into the Rapidan. He (General Lee) thinks if the enemy advances
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
oops to the left of the road being driven out in disorder, the enemy struck our left at the angle formed by the two wings of the Thirty-third regiment. We opposed this force for à short time (the Thirty-third regiment fighting like heroes), but could not long stand the terrible fire on our front and flank. We were forced back in disorder with the other troops and reformed again to the rear. We afterwards occupied a position to the left of the road, and that night connected with Ramseur of Ewell's corps and intrenched. Unfortunate as was the affair of the morning, I can attach no blame whatever to my brigade for anything it did on that occasion. The fight of the day previous, the subsequent gallantry of my command in many hard fought battles, and the great losses it has sustained in this campaign, are sufficient to show that brave men are sometimes forced to turn their back to the foe. If a mistake was made either on the night of the 5th or morning of the 6th, the fault was elsewh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
tanding here in the rain to guard their precious carcasses, must be content to take back seats when we get home. I gave him my hand there in the dark, and my pledge that I would stand with him on the camp platform. These frequent movements with cavalry, often requiring long or very rapid marches, made the men begin to speak of the regiment as the foot cavalry. But the first time I ever heard the sobriquet publicly applied was after the evacuation of Manassas, in March, 1862, while General Ewell was holding with his division the line of the Rappahannock. Our regiment had been on picket at Bealton Station as a support to Stuart's cavalry, and the enemy were rapidly advancing in large force, when another infantry regiment came down on a train of cars to relieve us. We had just gotten on the train, our friends were rapidly forming line of battle to meet the Federal advance, Jeb Stuart was going to the front with his fighting jacket on, and our train was slowly moving back, when a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
on, our right resting at the salient beyond the brick-kiln. That night we moved very rapidly to the support of a part of Ewell's command, but not being needed, we were ordered back to our previous position. On the 11th we were ordered still furtheition, I directed them to form on my left, and while this movement was being executed by that brigade, Doles's brigade of Ewell's corps, moved in line of battle from the woods, and occupied the new works from which my men had driven the enemy. At Gt part of our works which we had just left. The main object of this movement, however, as I was informed, was to relieve Ewell's front, which at that time was heavily pressed by the enemy. On reaching Lieutenant-Colonel Cowan, I faced my whole brie. My brigade continued to fight the enemy until the head of the two parallel lines of the enemy, which were coming from Ewell's front, were in skirmishing distance of us, and as I could see no indications of an intention on the part of Colonel Wei
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
few of the more important movements of our army. Ewell's division held the line of the Rappahannock, while e valley army. It was, indeed, uncertain, whether Ewell would be sent to join Jackson, or be ordered to Richcamp-ground. On the afternoon of the 30th of April, Ewell entered Swift Run Gap, which Jackson had just left, aunton, to strike Fremont's advance under Milroy. Ewell's division at this time, consisted of Gen. R. Tayloris time and subsequently of seeing a good deal of Gen. Ewell, and he impressed me as being every inch a soldiestructions and was just mounting to ride off when Gen. Ewell called him back and said: One thing more captain,nge of proposed operations in the valley, he ordered Ewell to move down the Luray valley, while he marched acroewmarket, and then over Massanuttin mountain to join Ewell in his advance. I shall never forget the enthusiaplied us abundantly with food of every description. Ewell continued to lead the advance, which was directed on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
to do is another question, and he does not seem to have long hesitated as to entering the lists (as he expresses it in his report) for a race to the Potomac. General Ewell, with Trimble's brigade and some cavalry, was sent on the morning of Saturday, May 24th, by the direct road to Winchester, while Jackson moved his main body aceconnoitered the position, going so close to the skirmish line of the enemy, that two officers were wounded at his side, and immediately made his dispositions. Gen. Ewell was on the direct road from Front Royal, fighting his way towards the town; Gen. Jackson's division and Taylor's brigade were advancing on the enemy to the leftear him the emphatic order, Forward after the enemy! The whole line swept gallantly onward, the brave resistance of the enemy was of but short duration, and while Ewell drove everything before him on the east of the town, Taylor and Jackson's old division swept down from the western side of the pike, Elzey moved rapidly forward on
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
burg to relieve General Banks, and capture or destroy Jackson's and Ewell's force. You are instructed, laying aside for the present the moveraod. Your object will be the capture of the forces of Jackson and Ewell, either in co-operation with General Fremont, or in case want of sue him. Reports received this moment are that Banks is fighting with Ewell eight miles from Winchester. Abraham Lincoln. Major-General McDowehile Shields was waiting to join him from Front Royal. The head of Ewell's column filed to the right at Strausburg, and was soon engaged in he was a near relative of mine), I learned the sad details from General Ewell and others who were present. The enemy having pressed forward osen field of battle, he continued his retreat to Cross Keys, where Ewell was ordered to check Fremont, while with the rest of his force Jackhis same hour in the early morning of June 8th, Fremont advanced on Ewell at Cross Keys. I remember that Rev. Dr. Geo. B. Taylor (now missio
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