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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 347 7 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 317 55 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 268 46 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 147 23 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 145 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 141 29 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 140 16 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 134 58 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 129 13 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 123 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Ewell or search for Ewell in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second Manassas campaign. (search)
Munford had seen much service in the Valley under Jackson, and had performed the same duty for him during the battles around Richmond. At Bristoe Station Jackson sent Colonel Munford to surprise and capture the place; this he succeeded in doing, dispersing a cavalry company, capturing forty-three of an infantry regiment, and killing and wounding a goodly number. He participated in the movements that culminated in the capture of Manassas Junction with a large quantity of stores, and when Ewell had to withdraw from Bristoe Station, the 2d and 5th regiments, under Munford and Rosser, covered his rear. On the 28th, 29th and 30th of July, 1862, the fights at Grovetown and Manassas occurred. There were numerous engagements of the cavalry, with only a few reports. In one of these, near the Lewis House, Robertson's brigade, to which the 2d regiment had been attached, met Buford's cavalry brigade in one of the most brilliant fights of the war. Every account I have met with, accords to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
ns, ambulances, etc. Quite a number of prisoners were taken and several hundred negroes who had been persuaded to run away from their owners. Early next morning Ewell's division marched in the direction of Bristow, the remainder of the corps to Manassas Junction, which place Jackson's division reached about 7 or 8 o'clock in thee right had a hard fight, in which the enemy were defeated and retreated during the night. Brigadier-General Taliaferro, commanded Jackson's division, and Major-General Ewell, being amongst the wounded. The next morning the 2nd Brigade were marched to the right of Jackson's line on top of a large hill, where there were severalsition behind an unfinished railroad which ran parallel to and north of the Warrenton pike and I suppose about a mile from it. Jackson's division was on the right, Ewell's next and A. P. Hill's on the left. The 2nd Brigade was marched from the hill to the left about half a mile, where we formed a line of battle in two lines, in a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.38 (search)
n, and he had seen the captain of ordnance and they had sent for ammunition. A Glimpse of General Ewell. After waiting what I thought a long time, I sent out another man on the same errand, who Hill's corps that day, and held both the right and left of Lee's line.] I then inquired for General Ewell's headquarters. Its general direction was pointed out to me; found it after considerable trouble, and saw that the enemy had found it before I had. Ewell was standing before a portable field table with writing material on it, and his staff a short distance in his front, and shells were falling fast and furious all around. General Ewell was wearing an artificial leg in the place of the natural one he lost near Sudley's Mills, and he had lately married a widow whom he was accustomed told not be willing to guide him to our brigade. The trip would be too dangerous; that I supposed Ewell knew what enemy were in our rear, and would drive them back. I then galloped to my right. I su
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Steel breast plates (search)
l soldiers were buried, was proof that they did wear armor, although this point had been disputed. I was surprised to find that this had ever been disputed. I myself have seen two styles of armor worn by them at the first battle of Manassas. I saw a vest made of strips of steel about an inch wide, connected together, but very flexible. This vest was taken from the body of a dead Federal soldier. At the first day's fight at Gettysburg I was courier for the inspector of Early's Division, Ewell's Corps, my business being to attend to the wounded and prisoners, I found a dead Federal soldier who had on a vest shaped armor, made of very thin steel. This was in two solid pieces, one for the back, and the other for the front, but the soldier was killed by a shell which tore his left arm out of the shoulder socket. This man was no coward, as the following pathetic account will show. By his side lay his furlough, dated the day before the fight, stating that it was to enable him to go
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
hree weeks guarding the captured cannon, which were parked around General Beauregard's headquarters. From Manassas we went into camp on Bull Run, and there were brigaded with the 5th, 6th and 12th Alabama Regiments, under command of General Dick Ewell. Brigadier-General R. E. Rhodes, of Alabama, succeeded General Ewell in command of the brigade, and we were ordered to Davis' Crossroads, in Fairfax county. During the remainder of the summer and fall of 1861 our regiment was doing picket duty General Ewell in command of the brigade, and we were ordered to Davis' Crossroads, in Fairfax county. During the remainder of the summer and fall of 1861 our regiment was doing picket duty in front of Alexandria and along the Alexandria Railroad. About the 1st of November, 1861, shortly after the battle of Leesburg, while we were encampted at Camp Van Dorn, our colonel, Griffith, was promoted brigadier and placed in command of the Mississippi regiments engaged in that fight, and Captain Henry Hughes, of the Claiborne Guards, elected colonel in his stead. In December, 1861, we went into winter quarters at Davis' ford, some six miles from Manassas, on the Occoquan river, in P
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
de exceedingly difficult, if not practically impossible, the provisioning of the Confederate army, and that the departure of that command and its march toward Lynchburg might soon be expected. The victory of Fire Forks was so complete in every way as to wholly paralyze General Lee's plan for further delay, and it is not too much to say that the decison was at once made for the western movement of the Army of Northern Virginia toward a new supply base. The battle of Sailor's Creek, with Ewell's surrender, and that of Farmville, followed quickly after, the Confederates being hard pressed on their left flank, and for them there was little rest owing to the continual hounding by Sherman's forces which seemed quite eager for constant combat. The Fifth Army Corps had been detailed to work with Sheridan's cavalry division. The subsequent relief of General Warren is a matter of history, which there is no need of repeating. General Griffin succeeded to command, and aided by the