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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers at Gettysburg. (search)
rer marching before crossing the Potomac, than my division or any other part of Ewell's corps had done. The weather was also more sultry during the period of their ood of there being at least as much loss in Longstreet's and Hill's corps as in Ewell's, I quote from General Kershaw's report the following statement: Tuesday, Juneat of course, after the arrival of his chief, all responsibility was taken from Ewell in not ordering the troops forward — it was assumed by and is to be placed on Gt began to fall back, settles the question of his presence beyond all dispute. Ewell is therefore relieved from the responsibility for not ordering a general advancan advance on our part that presented themselves on the occasion. The order to Ewell contemplated the use of only his own troops then at hand, to carry the hill, ifter view from Seminary ridge, and he ordered none of Hill's troops to advance. Ewell could not do so when the Commanding-General was present. If he had gone forwar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
short, and it was not until after 9 A. M., according to Swinton, page 431, that Hancock renewed the advance. He says over two hours were in this manner lost, leaving Longstreet ample time to form line of battle. Page 130. Spotsylvania Courthouse.--Upon an examination of the lines, General Lee had detected the weakness of that portion known as the salient, to the right of the point assailed on the 10th, to which I have just alluded, and occupied by the division of General Edward Johnson (Ewell's corps), and had directed a second line to be constructed across its base, to which he purposed to move back the troops occupying the angle. These arrangements were not quite completed when he thought he saw cause to suspect another flank movement by General Grant; and, on the night of the 11th, ordered most of the artillery at this portion of the line to be withdrawn, so as to be available to take part in the counter-movement. Towards the dawn of day on the 12th, General Johnson discover
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the Wilderness. (search)
o Brock's bridge, on the border of Orange county, a distance of about sixteen (16) miles. Early on the morning of the 5th resumed my march on the----and Catharpin roads to Richard's shop, on Catharpin road. During the latter part of this day's march, Rosser was skirmishing in my front with his brigade of cavalry. At 12.30 A. M. on the 6th started for Parker's store, on the Plank road, in obedience to orders received from the Commanding-General, who also informed me that Generals Hill and Ewell had been heavily engaged the previous day. Arriving at Parker's store about dawn, I was directed tomove my column down the Plank road to relieve the divisions of Heth and Wilcox, which were in position in face of the enemy on the right and left of the Plank road, at right angles with it and about three miles below Parker's store. Kershaw's division was in the lead, arriving in rear of the line held by these two divisions; and when the head of my column had filed to the right, and had only t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
uable statement of the relative numbers and resources of the North and the South. His account of the Fort Donelson campaign and of the battle of Shiloh seems fuller and more accurate than any that has yet appeared. Indeed, the book is a very valuable contribution to the history of the first year of the Confederacy. It is a proud legacy of devoted patriotism, chivalric daring, stainless character and noble example which Johnston and Lee, and Jackson, and Stuart, and Polk, and Hill, and Ewell, and others of our fallen chieftains, have bequeathed to the people of the South, and this charming tribute of an accomplished son to a noble father will write the name of Sidney Johnston even higher on the scroll of fame than the popular verdict had placed it. It is a high compliment to our talented sculptor, Edward Valentine, that the beautiful engraving which adorns the frontispiece was made from his superb bust of General Johnston, which the family pronounce the best likeness extant.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
t of the Blue Ridge and held the passes, while Ewell passed through the Valley and cleared it of thurg road, around the village of Fayetteville. Ewell had marched towards Carlisle and Harrisburg. uly for Cashtown; but Hill, having reported to Ewell that the enemy were at Gettysburg, changed the a mill on Marsh creek. Johnson's division of Ewell's corps reached the field a little before darkthe attack as early as possible on the 2d, and Ewell and Hill to afford him vigorous co-operation. is army arrived. And in a conference with General Ewell, General Rodes. and myself, when he reach attack. The conference between Generals Lee, Ewell, Early and Rodes was no doubt subsequent to thttack, directed a reconnoissance to be made in Ewell's front, with the view of renewing the assaultnto Maryland and place himself on the right of Ewell — upon the suggestion of the former officer thantry, and a bloody battle was fought. Two of Ewell's divisions came upon the field, and one, to b[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General S. McGowan of battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
vy firing at some distance to our left and front indicated an engagement of General Ewell, who had marched down the turnpike parallel with and between the Plank road and the river. In order, as I supposed, to co-operate with General Ewell, our division left the Plank road at Poague's artillery, and, filing square to the left, and reaching open fields, formed line of battle looking towards the right of General Ewell, then in sight. The brigades of Generals Lane and Thomas advanced some disnd proceed to the left and endeavor to open communication with the right of General Ewell. We drove the enemy's sharpshooters from a house and had a sharp skirmish, but in a short time succeeded in connecting with the right of General Ewell. We here threw up breastworks and lay upon our arms the remainder of the day. In the9 o'clock A. M., when I was directed to march with my brigade and report to General Ewell, who directed Major-General Rodes to put me in on the right of his line to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wilderness. (search)
vy firing at some distance to our left and front indicated an engagement of General Ewell, who had marched down the turnpike parallel with and between the Plank road and the river. In order, as I supposed, to co-operate with General Ewell, our division left the Plank road at Poague's artillery, and, filing square to the left, and reaching open fields, formed line of battle looking towards the right of General Ewell, then in sight. The brigades of Generals Lane and Thomas advanced some disnd proceed to the left and endeavor to open communication with the right of General Ewell. We drove the enemy's sharpshooters from a house and had a sharp skirmish, but in a short time succeeded in connecting with the right of General Ewell. We here threw up breastworks and lay upon our arms the remainder of the day. In the9 o'clock A. M., when I was directed to march with my brigade and report to General Ewell, who directed Major-General Rodes to put me in on the right of his line to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg — the battle on the right. (search)
the battle, and that ground cannot be fairly designated by any other term than that of the want of generalship. I commanded one of the five Alabama infantry regiments of Brigadier-General Law's brigade of Hood's division, Longstreet's corps. As to when the division left Chambersburg, I don't pretend to know, for Law's brigade was on picket some three or four miles southeast of that town on the 1st day of July, when, in the afternoon, the cannonading of the engagement between portions of Ewell's and Hill's corps and the Federals under Reynolds, Howard and Doubleday, near Gettysburg, was distinctly heard by us. About dark we received an order to be ready to move at any moment. Subsequently, we were ordered to cook rations and be ready to move at 4 o'clock A. M. When that hour came, the brigade was put in motion, and after a rapid and fatiguing march, it arrived on the field within sight of Gettysburg at about 2 o'clock P. M., having marched, as I now recollect, between twenty and