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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 15: Cedar Run. (search)
eeting one or two acquaintances. After visiting a mother, whose son had fallen in his command, he returned to his tent. On the 19th of July, he reached Gordonsville with his corps, and took quarters in the hospitable house of Reverend D. B. Ewing, where he had before found a pleasant resting place, when passing through the village. He appeared jaded by his excessive labors, and positively unwell; and said that he had not suffered so much, since his return from Mexico. But the rest, the breezes, and the fresh fruits in which he so much delighted, speedily restored the vigor of his frame. He loved to refresh himself here, after the labors of the day were finished, with the social converse of the amiable family which surrounded Mr. Ewing's board, and with the prattle of his children. One of these, while sitting upon his knee, was captivated with the bright military buttons upon his coat, and petitioned that when the garment was worn out, he should give her one as a keepsake.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Condition of the Army-rebuilding the Railroad- General Burnside's situation-orders for battle-plans for the attack-hooker's position- Sherman's movements (search)
Kelly's Ferry. Sherman had left Bridgeport the night of the 14th, reached Chattanooga the evening of the 15th, made the above-described inspection on the morning of the 16th, and started back the same evening to hurry up his command, fully appreciating the importance of time. His march was conducted with as much expedition as the roads and season would admit of. By the 20th he was himself at Brown's Ferry with the head of column, but many of his troops were far behind, and one division (Ewing's) was at Trenton, sent that way to create the impression that Lookout was to be taken from the south. Sherman received his orders at the ferry, and was asked if he could not be ready for the assault the following morning. News had been received that the battle had been commenced at Knoxville. Burnside had been cut off from telegraphic communications. The President, the Secretary of War, and General Halleck were in an agony of suspense. My suspense was also great, but more endurable, be
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Preparations for battle-thomas Carries the first line of the enemy-sherman Carries Missionary Ridge--battle of Lookout Mountain--General Hooker's fight (search)
ace in the bridge. By a little past noon the bridge was completed, as well as one over the South Chickamauga connecting the troops left on that side with their comrades below, and all the infantry and artillery were on the south bank of the Tennessee. Sherman as once formed his troops for assault on Missionary Ridge. By one o'clock he started with M. L. Smith on his left, keeping nearly the course of Chickamauga River; J. E. Smith next to the right and a little to the rear; and [Hugh] Ewing still farther to the right and also a little to the rear of J. E. Smith's command, in column, ready to deploy to the right if an enemy should come from that direction. A good skirmish line preceded each of these columns. Soon the foot of the hill was reached; the skirmishers pushed directly up, followed closely by their supports. By half-past 3 Sherman was in possession of the height without having sustained much loss. A brigade from each division was now brought up, and artillery was dr
h good effect on the enemy during the four hours contest on Sunday evening. I have also to mention Ordnance-Sergeant J. F. Baxter, wounded on the field. This man is an untiring officer and faithful to his trust. The provost guard, under Lieutenants Ewing and Orr, rendered invaluable service. I am pleased to notice the conduct of Private Turner Goodall, of the provost guard, who, in the thickest of the fight on Sunday evening, seeing the men all so gallantly at work and hard pressed, came ucouragement to his fellow-soldiers and example, did his whole duty as a soldier and provost guard. The capture of prisoners by this brigade in the two days fight exceeds six hundred men and officers sent to the rear. I would also mention Lieutenant Ewing, of the provost guard, from the Seventeenth Tennessee regiment, who, finding that the officers of his company had all been placed hors de combat, asked permission and returned to take command of his company on Sunday morning. He is a worthy
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The burning of Columbia, South Carolina-report of the Committee of citizens appointed to collect testimony. (search)
visit, expressed his regret at the burning of our convent, disclaimed the act, attributing it to the intoxication of his soldiers, and told me to choose any house in town for a convent and it should be ours. He deputed his Adjutant-General, Colonel Ewing, to act in his stead. Colonel Ewing reminded us of General Sherman's offer to give us any house in Columbia we might choose for a convent. We have thought of it, said we, and of asking for General Preston's house, which is large. That is wColonel Ewing reminded us of General Sherman's offer to give us any house in Columbia we might choose for a convent. We have thought of it, said we, and of asking for General Preston's house, which is large. That is where General Logan holds his headquarters, said he, and orders have already been given, I know, to burn it on tomorrow morning; but if you say you will take it for a convent, I will speak to the General and the order will be countermanded. On the following morning, after many inquiries, we learned from the officer in charge (General Perry, I think) that his orders were to fire it unless the Sisters were in actual possession of it, but if even a detachment of Sisters were in it, it should be sp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cleburne and his division at Missionary ridge and Ringgold gap. (search)
fairly up the troops were called to arms by picket firing, followed soon after by the line and artillery, and the conflict soon rose to the dignity of a general engagement. Repeated attempts were made to carry Cleburne's position, and the assaulting columns were repulsed and hurled bleeding down the slope, only to reform and charge again in gallant but vain effort. Cleburne's veterans found foeman worthy of their steel in the army commanded by Sherman and led by such lieutenants as Corse, Ewing, Leightburn, and Loomis. Almost the entire day was thus consumed. The enemy, met at every advance by a plunging and destructive artillery fire, followed, when in range, by a withering fire of infantry, were repulsed at all points, and slowly and stubbornly fell back. In some instances squads of them finding shelter behind the obstructions afforded by the rugged sides of the hill, kept up a damaging sharp-shooting until dislodged by stones hurled down upon them by the Texans. Meanwhile
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
hornton's Command till September. Skirmish at Allen July 23 (Co. G ). Huntsville July 24 (Co. F ). Dripping Springs August 15-16 (Co. F ). Columbia August 16 (Co. F ). Rocheport August 20 (Co. F ). Battalion moved to Rolla, Mo., arriving September 23, 1864. 3rd Battalion at Alton, Ills., till August, 1864. Moved to Benton Barracks, thence to Rolla, Mo., arriving there September 19. Operations against Price's invasion of Missouri September to November. Cover Ewing's retreat from Pilot Knob to Rolla, September 27-30. Moved to Jefferson City, Mo. Defence of Jefferson City October 6-7. Moreau Bottom October 7. Booneville October 9-12. Glasgow October 15. Little Blue October 21. Independence October 22. Hickman's Mill October 23. Mine Creek, Little Osage, Marias des Cygnes, Kansas, October 25. Returned to Springfield, Mo., thence moved to Cassville and Rolla, arriving November 15. Duty there till January, 1865. At Pilot
irginia, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Kanawha Division, Dept. of the Mountains, to May, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Kanawha Division, West Virginia, to August, 1862. District of the Kanawha, West Virginia, Dept. of the Ohio, to December, 1862. Ewing's Brigade, Kanawha Division, West Virginia, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to October, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps, to June, 1865. Dept. of Arkansas to August, 18n, West Virginia, to March, 1862. 2nd Brigade, Kanawha Division, West Virginia, to May, 1862. 3rd Brigade, Kanawha Division, West Virginia, to August, 1862. District of the Kanawha, West Virginia, Dept. of the Ohio, to December, 1862. Ewing's Brigade, Kanawha Division, West Virginia, to January, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to October, 1863. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 15th Army Corps, to June, 1865. Dept. of Arkansas to August, 18
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
they were unable to raise a new issue, and their organization rapidly went to pieces after 1852. In the meantime a change was taking place in the personnel of political leadership. Calhoun See Book II, Chap. XV. died before the compromise bill became a law, Clay Ibid. and Webster See Book II, Chap. XVI. in 1852. A number of men of less distinction but of invaluable service retired from politics about the same time: Van Buren in 1848, likewise Benton, Winthrop of Massachusetts, Ewing of Ohio, Foote of Mississippi, and Berrien of Georgia in 1851. With the death or retirement of these men the sentiment for union which they had fostered, declined. Among those who took their places partizanship was supreme, and until the advent of Lincoln originality and sincerity were almost totally lacking. It is not surprising, therefore, that for two decades after 1850 political thought and discussion centred around inherited issues relating to sectionalism and nationality. In the
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
ine, 275 Evans (Wilson), Augusta Jane, 69 Evans C., 539 Evans G. H., 436 Evans L. J., 205 Evarts, 122 Evening post (New York), 218, 327 Evening Sun (New York), 22 Everett, A. H., 431 Everett, C. C., 240 Everett, Edward, 415, 418, 449, 451, 452, 453, 455, 457 Evershed, Emilie, 597 Everybody's, 316, 317 Every day English, 474 Every Saturday, 36 Eve's diary, 20 Evolution and religion, 210 Evolution of Dodd, 419 Evolution of Trinitarianism, 207 Ewing, 337 Examen, 185 Examiner (San Fraicisco), 329 Examiner and journal of political Economy the, 438 Excuse Me, 295 Exodus for Oregon, 55 Expedition of the Donner party and its tragic fate, the, 146 Exploration and Survey of the Valley of great Salt Lake, 150-1 Exploration of the Colorado River of the West, 158 Exploration of the Valley of the Amazon, 136 Explorations and adventures in Equatorial Africa, 163 Exposition, or a New theory of animal Magnetism, 526 Exterm
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