Your search returned 42 results in 16 document sections:

1 2
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 15: siege of Fort Pickens.--Declaration of War.--the Virginia conspirators and, the proposed capture of Washington City. (search)
at once terminate her [Tennessee's] grand mission of peacemaker between the States of the South and the General Government. Nay, more, they said; the almost inevitable result would be the transfer of the war within her own borders, the defeat of all hopes of reconciliation, and the deluging of the State with the blood of her own people. Address to the People of Tennessee: by Neil S. Brown, Russell Houston, E. H. Ewing, C. Johnstone, John Bell, R. J. Meigs, S. D. Morgan, John S. Brien, Andrew Ewing, John H. Callender, and Baylie Peyton. The Governor of Kentucky was less courageous and more cautious than his neighbor of Tennessee, but not less a practical enemy of the Union. To confirm him in disloyalty, and to commit the great State of Kentucky to the cause of the conspirators, Walker, their so-called Secretary of War, wrote to Governor Magoffin, from Montgomery, on the 22d of April, complimenting him for his patriotic response to the requisition of the President of the United
sion of Hornby, P. 22 Etheridge, Emerson, speech at Louisville, Ky., D. 82 Eubank, John L., secretary of the Virginia convention, Doc. 70 Europe, S. C. agents in, D. 76 Evarts, William M., speech at the Union meeting, N. Y., Doc. 92 Everett, Edward, address of, at New York, July 4, 1861, Int. 5; speech at Boston, D. 48, 61; speech at Chester Square, Boston, April 27, Doc. 161; address at Roxbury, Mass., Doc. 205 Everett, —, Lieut.-Col., D. 102, 103 Ewing, Andrew, Doc. 138 Ewing, Edwin H., a traitor, D. 41; speech at Nashville, Doc. 137 Expedition. a newspaper of the Penn. Fifth Regiment, D. 97 F Fairfax Court House, Va., Lieut. Tompkins' charge at, D. 89; prisoners recaptured at, D. 90; official reports of the skirmish at, May 31, Doc. 321; rebel account of, Doc. 322; incident of, P. 139 Fales, Fanny, P. 16 Fallon, John O., D. 52 Fall River, Mass., meeting in, D. 34 Farnham, Noah L., appointed colonel of F
k of the railroads converging in Nashville was brought into requisition, and the machinery in the armory, guns, and much valuable provisions, etc., were removed. Seven trains, loaded with women and children inside, and crowded with frightened men on the top, left the city in one day. As soon as it was supposed that the enemy were advancing — in fact, early on Sunday morning--a meeting of prominent citizens was held, and a committee of gentlemen, consisting of Ex-Gov. E. S. Brown, the Hon. Andrew Ewing, and the Hon. Edwin Ewing, decided that the surrender should be made only on condition that private persons and property should be respected; but these terms had not, at the latest advices, been submitted to the Union commander. Gen. Johnston informed the citizens that he should be compelled to evacuate the place on account of his inability to defend it with the force at his command, and Gen. Pillow subsequently made a speech to the public, in which he informed them that the army wo
as known among the leading secesh at McMinnville, they conceived the brilliant idea of bagging his entire command. Hon. Andrew Ewing, the invincible pike-man, Judge Ridley, and Judge Marchbanks, engineered the plot, and Andrew Ewing, who has determAndrew Ewing, who has determined, I suppose, like Gov. Harris, to take the field, actually got on the outside of a horse, with a single-barrelled shot-gun for his weapon, and personally went with the expedition. They were confident of surrounding the unguarded Hastings, and co, to take position under cover of a thick clump of cedars, and there await the enemy. On came the confederates, with Mr. Ewing in their midst. When they had advanced to the point at which they formed their line of battle, the valiant Nestor hara panic. Sabres, guns, and whatever else impeded the stampede, were scattered along the various paths of their flight. Mr. Ewing's shot-gun was found in a creek, hard by the scene of his great achievement, the barrel separated from the stock by the
as known among the leading secesh at McMinnville, they conceived the brilliant idea of bagging his entire command. Hon. Andrew Ewing, the invincible pike-man, Judge Ridley, and Judge Marchbanks, engineered the plot, and Andrew Ewing, who has determAndrew Ewing, who has determined, I suppose, like Gov. Harris, to take the field, actually got on the outside of a horse, with a single-barrelled shot-gun for his weapon, and personally went with the expedition. They were confident of surrounding the unguarded Hastings, and co, to take position under cover of a thick clump of cedars, and there await the enemy. On came the confederates, with Mr. Ewing in their midst. When they had advanced to the point at which they formed their line of battle, the valiant Nestor hara panic. Sabres, guns, and whatever else impeded the stampede, were scattered along the various paths of their flight. Mr. Ewing's shot-gun was found in a creek, hard by the scene of his great achievement, the barrel separated from the stock by the
M. Baylor, Assistant Quartermaster; Major B. C. Kennedy, Assistant Commissary of Subsistence, and Lieut. W. M. Bridges, aid-de-camp to the late Brigadier-General Duncan, reported just before the engagement, and joined my staff, on which they served through the battle. Col. M. L. Clark, of the artillery, P. A., living in Murfreesboro on temporary service, did me the honor to join and serve on my staff during the engagement. His Excellency, Isham G. Harris, Governor of Tennessee, and the Hon. Andrew Ewing, member of the Military Court, volunteered their services, and rendered efficient aid, especially with the Tennessee troops, largely in the ascendant in the army. It is but due to the zealous and efficient laborer of our cause that I here bear testimony to the cordial support given me at all times since meeting him a year ago in West-Tennessee, by his Excellency Governor Harris. From the field of Shiloh, where he received in his arms the dying form of the lamented Johnson, to the l
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 61 1/2.--address to the people of Tennessee. (search)
ent of this object. Let Tennessee, then, prepare thoroughly and efficiently for coming events. In the meantime, let her, as speedily as she can, hold a Conference with her sister slaveholding States yet in the Union, for the purpose of devising plans for the preservation of the peace of the land. Fellow-citizens of Tennessee, we entreat you to bring yourselves up to the magnitude of the crisis. Look in the face impending calamities. Civil war — what is it? The bloodiest and darkest pages of history answer this question. To avert this, who would not give his time, his talents, his untiring energy — his all? There may be yet time to accomplish every thing. Let us not despair. The Border Slave States may prevent this civil war; and why shall they not do it? Neil S. Brown, Russell Houston, E. H. Ewing, C. Johnson, John Bell, R. J. Meigs, S. D. Morgan, John S. Brien, Andrew Ewing, John H. Callender, Bailie Peyton. Nashville, April 18, 1861. --Louisville Journ
ent. The District of Columbia was carved out of Southern territory, and they ought not to be permitted to hold an island in our own country. He was therefore for taking it. He was for unity of action among all the States of the South under any military leader who was best qualified to lead them. He said that though Mr. Jefferson Davis had not been a favorite with him as a politician, he believed him to be as able and competent a military commander as there is in the South, and lie was for marching under him, or any other man, against the invaders of Southern soil. His cry was, To arms! To arms! not only to resist the invasion of our own soil, but that of any of the Southern States. He had no thought of accepting the poor privilege of being swallowed up at last. Hon. Andrew Ewing followed, declaring, in the strongest and most emphatic terms, for resistance to the attempted subjugation of the South. He was for the whole South standing as a unit.--Nashville Banner, April 24.
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1861., [Electronic resource], Explosion of an oil well — loss of Life and frightful Scenes. (search)
Tennessee a Unit. We learn that John Bell, Andrew Ewing, E. H. Ewing, and other distinguished men, heretofore hopeful Unionists, on the 23d, addressed a vast meeting at Nashville. Mr. Bell took the ground that the usurpation of Lincoln released every State from its obligations to the Federal Government — that Tennessee was a sovereign, independent State--that all her citizens should arm at once, and resist to the death all invasion of Southern soil. A united South was the universal cry of the meeting.--The Banner expects that three regiments will be speedily on the way to the assistance of Virginia. Fifty thousand volunteers will be ready at an hour's notice.
Tennessee and Kentucky. The people of Nashville recently held a meeting for the purpose of giving a public expression of sentiment in reference to the neutrality of Kentucky. Hon. Andrew Ewing, chairman of the Committee on Resolutions, reported the following: The people of Tennessee, deeply impressed with the suffering and distress likely to arise from a hostile collision between their forces and those of Kentucky, earnestly desire in this hour of calmness to express their strong conviction that such a struggle should be avoided. Born from the same ancestry, entering the Federal Union at the same time, fighting side by side against the Indians, the British and the Mexicans, generally concurring in our Federal policy, and united geographically and socially by the closest connections and tier, it will be a deplorable result for us to sever our association by war and bloodshed.--We firmly believe that no reasonable ground exists for the production of such a calamity. Te
1 2