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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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on, a well-known citizen of this county; the gallant Lieut. E. B. Shields, of this city; Lieut. Baillie Peyton, Jr., of Sumner County; James Patterson, of this county, color-bearer of Battle's regiment; James Gray, orderly-sergeant of Capt. Rice's company, Col. Battle's regiment. Col. H. M. Fogg, Aid to Gen. Zollicoffer, was wounded early in the engagement. Our reports in regard to his condition are conflicting. A dispatch to Orville Ewing, Esq., states that Orville Ewing, son of the Hon. Edwin Ewing, of this city, is wounded and a prisoner. Two sons of John D. Goss, Esq., of this city, are among the wounded. Wm. Battle, son of the colonel of the regiment, is among the list. Colonel Stanton, slightly. It is impossible at this moment to sum up the extent of our loss. According to the Northern accounts, which we publish in our telegraphic columns this morning, our loss in killed and wounded is put down at two hundred and seventy-five, with no statement in regard to the number
ing in Nashville was brought into requisition, and the machinery in the armory, guns, and much valuable provisions, etc., were removed. Seven trains, loaded with women and children inside, and crowded with frightened men on the top, left the city in one day. As soon as it was supposed that the enemy were advancing — in fact, early on Sunday morning--a meeting of prominent citizens was held, and a committee of gentlemen, consisting of Ex-Gov. E. S. Brown, the Hon. Andrew Ewing, and the Hon. Edwin Ewing, decided that the surrender should be made only on condition that private persons and property should be respected; but these terms had not, at the latest advices, been submitted to the Union commander. Gen. Johnston informed the citizens that he should be compelled to evacuate the place on account of his inability to defend it with the force at his command, and Gen. Pillow subsequently made a speech to the public, in which he informed them that the army would fall back and endeavor
ing in Nashville was brought into requisition, and the machinery in the Armory, guns, and much valuable provisions. &c., were removed. Seven trains, loaded with women and children inside and crowded with frightened men on the top, left the city in one day. As soon as it was supposed that the enemy were advancing — in fact, early Sunday morning--a meeting of prominent citizens was held and a committee of gentlemen, consisting of Ex-Governor E. S. Brown, Hon. Andrew Ewing, and Hon. Edwin Ewing, decided that the surrender should be made only on condition that private persons and property should be respected; but these terms had not, at the latest advices, been submitted to the Federal commander. Gen. Johnston informed the citizens that he should be compelled to evacuate the place on account of his inability to defend it with the force at his command, and Gen. Pillow subsequently made a speech to the public, in which he informed them that the army would fall back and endeavor