Your search returned 21 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
and to add to our sufferings, it commenced snowing rapidly about the middle of the day. The troops, however, continued on until within about four miles of Bath, a small village, when our advance, consisting of Colonel Gilham's brigade, came upon a scouting party of the enemy, which fired into them, and which was promptly returned by Company F, of Richmond, and Company B, of Baltimore, putting the Yankees to rout. Lieutenant Payne, of Company F, was seriously wounded in the neck, and private William Exall, of the same company, wounded in the leg, which had to be amputated, and which, I regret to say, has since caused his death. Our army now encamped for the night, and such a night I never desire to witness again. The snow, rain, and hail fell the whole night, and we had again to endure it without blankets or covering of any kind; but the men were so fatigued nature could hold out no longer, and down they would drop on the wet ground, and sleep as well as they could, having made larg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Historical sketch of the Rockbridge artillery, C. S. Army, by a member of the famous battery. (search)
hill-side was so steep it was hard to keep from rolling out of bed and taking beds with us. On the 3d of January we resumed the march; weather intensely cold. We were halted about four miles before we reached the town of Bath, with expectation of having a brush with the enemy. Were in hearing of a slight skirmish which took place ahead of us between F. Company (which was the van of the regiment and of the advancing column), of the Twenty-first Virginia infantry and the Federals. Private William Exall and Lieutenant James B. Payne of that company, were wounded, the former fatally, dying the same day, and the latter so as to incapacitate him for further service in the field. The Federals were in ambush, to the right of the road. Their fire was unexpected, but it was warmly returned, when they broke cover, and scattering, were pursued desultorily by the advance of the column, and a number of them killed.—Ed. We fell back a few hundred yards to a branch near a saw-mill, and a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Joseph Jones, M. D., Ll.D. (search)
y, Professor J. F., 1. Dinwiddie Courthouse, Engagement at, 75. Dismal Swamp, Success at, 65. Dispatch, Richmond, Va., cited, 79, 175, 205, 229, 253, 259, 274, 283, 290, 292, 318, 323, 330, 342, 348, 379 Donaldsonville Artillery at Fredericksburg, 198. Drewry's Bluff, Assault of, 67. Durham, Captain Cicero A., death of, 68. Early, General J. A., 297, 344. Elliott, Captain, Chas. G., 174, 198. Equipment, 1861, A Soldier's, 300. Evans, General C. A., Address of, 1. Exall, Wm., Death of, 125. F Co. 21st Va. Infantry, 125. Falling Waters, Battle of, 46. Federal Depredations in 1865, 266. Federal Relief to Confederates, Protest of R. E. Lee Camp, C. V., against the Otey Bill, Federal Vessels Captured: Whistling Wind, Alfred H. Partridge. Mary Alvina, Bark Tacony, M. A. Shindler, Isaac Webb, Micawber, 277; Byzantium, Goodspeed, Marengo, Florence, Elizabeth Ann, Rufus Choate, Raffle, 278; Shatemuc, Archer, Caleb Cushing, 279. First and Last Days o
h Corporal, S. King; 1st Surgeon, T. B. Cunningham; Assistant Surgeon, P. Lyons. Privates — H. V. Anderson, Archer Anderson, Dr. J. H. Anderson, Wm. S. Archer, E. W. Ayres, Geo. C. Baughman, Chas C. Baughman, David Bridges, R. M. Bridges, Henry Bullington, H. Beers, R. Alonzo Brock, J. M. Binford, R. E. Binford, Ira Blunt, W. C. Barker, J. W. Chapman, M. T. Clarke, L. A. Cocke, Dr. John Clopton, A. C. Cole, J. A. Craig, H. D. Danforth,--Doggett, J. A. Dill, Jack Ellerson, C. H. Exall, Wm. Exall, R. Ellett, Samuel Etting, M. Fontaine, Wm. T. Gibson, W. G. Gray, S. Gray, J. W. Green, T. R. Green,--Gentry,--Gilliam, Irving Hull,--Haynes, Pat Henry, M. Hudgins, P. B. Jones, Dave Jones, R. J. Jordan, T. Kellogg,--Lind say, E. B. Meade, S. D. Mitchell, Chas. Mittledorfer, J. R. Mountcastle, A. H. Mebane, J. French Meredith, Charles A. McEvoy, W. H. P. Morriss, J. E. Mayo, R. McMurde, R. G. Maddux, W. Norwood, L. Nunnally,--Pardijons, J. G. Powell, W. A. Piet, H. Picot, J. H. B. Paine,
Death of a soldier. --The remains of Wm. Exall, of Company "F," Gilham's regiment, will arrive here this afternoon by the General train. He fell in a fight with the enemy near. Romney on Sunday last. We are requested to invite the old members of the company, and active members who are here on furlough, to meet at the depot at 4 o'clock, P. M., for the purpose of receiving the remains of their late comrade.
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1862., [Electronic resource], Escape of Negro prisoners from Fort Macon. (search)
The death of Wm. Exall, of Richmond. Winchester, Va., Jan. 6. --Wm. Exall, of Company F, of Richmond, was shot on yesterday, in a skirmish above Winchester. His body will be conveyed to Richmond in the cars on Tuesday afternoon, in charge of an escort of his company. The death of Wm. Exall, of Richmond. Winchester, Va., Jan. 6. --Wm. Exall, of Company F, of Richmond, was shot on yesterday, in a skirmish above Winchester. His body will be conveyed to Richmond in the cars on Tuesday afternoon, in charge of an escort of his company.
The Remains of William Exall, late of company "F," Gilham's regiment, arrived last evening by the Central train, attended by his brother, Charles Exall, and George Peterkin, of the same company. The skirmish in which this young gentleman lost his life took place on Friday last, near the town of Bath, in Morgan county, Virginia. He was shot in the thigh by a Minnie ball, and amputation was resorted to; but the swelling that supervened rendered it impossible to gather up the arteries, and he died on Saturday morning. Several of his old friends and associates were at the depot yesterday to receive his remains. The funeral service will take place at the Grace street Baptist Church, this morning, at 11 o'clock. We are requested to invite the old members of company "F," and members of company "B," Twenty-first regiment, to assemble on Capitol Square, at 10 o'clock, in uniform overcoats, fatigue caps, and white gloves, for the purpose of attending the funeral.
nsiderable distance from the Potomac river, and not likely at present to be the scene of any exploits performed by Jackson's or Loring's troops. There has been vigorous skirmishing in Morgan county within a few days past, but with no important result on either side. On Friday evening last, if we are correctly informed, Company F, of Richmond, and Company B, of Baltimore, were sent forward to a point near the town of Bath, and met a small body of the enemy. It was in this skirmish that Mr. Wm. Exall, of this city, was mortally wounded, and 3d Lieut, James Paine, also of Company "F," received a severe, though not dangerous wound in the neck.--No further casualties are reported on our side Twelve Yankees were taken prisoners on the same evening, and it is probable that some of the enemy were killed. We have not received any definite intelligence in regard to other skirmishes, in which the 48th Virginia (Col Campbell) and an Arkansas regiment are said to have been engaged; though from
Funeral. --The funeral of Wm. Exall, who was killed in a skirmish with the enemy in Morgan county, took place yesterday morning, and was attended by a large number of friends and acquaintances of the deceased. The old members of his company (F) and the L. I. Blues, with the Armory Band, performed escort duty on the occasion.
d, and, to add to our sufferings, it commenced snowing rapidly about the middle of the day. The troops, however, continued on until within about four miles of Bath, a small village, when our advance, consisting of Colonel Gilham's Brigade, came upon a scouting party of the enemy, which fired into them, and which was promptly returned by Company F, of Richmond, and Company B, of Baltimore, putting the Yankees to rout. Lieut. Payne, of Company F, was seriously wounded in the neck, and Private William Exall, of the same company, wounded in the leg, which had to be amputated, and which, I regret to say, has since caused his death. Our army now encamped for the night, and such a sight I never desire to witness again. The snow, rain, and hail fell the whole night, and we had again to encure it without blankets of covering of any kind; but the men were so fatigued, nature could hold out no longer, and down they would drop on the wet ground, and sleep as well as they could, having made lar
1 2