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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 5 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 15 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fagan or search for Fagan in all documents.

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f Princeton and Jenkins's Ferry, on the Saline, which point was reached on the twenty-seventh, and a pontoon thrown across. Here it was learned that the rebel General Fagan, with a large force and fourteen pieces of artillery, had left their camp, five miles above that point, and were moving up the river to where it could be forded, in order to cross and threaten Little Rock. A cavalry force was sent to intercept Fagan. About noon of that day it commenced raining, and continued to rain hard during that and the succeeding day. Price came up at this point, and the battle alluded to in yesterday's paper was fought on Saturday, the thirtieth. It was a splendaterial of war. After the defeat of the rebels, as the roads and weather prevented marching, General Steele decided to send General Carr to Little Rock to watch Fagan, as he felt confident of again whipping Price and Smith, should they conclude to attack again. As the rebels did not come to time, the army took up its line of