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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 5 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 15 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Fagan or search for Fagan in all documents.

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s could be hastily erected on the west bank of the Sabine river at Jenkins' Ferry. The whole bottom of the river was overflowed with water, which had to be waded some distance to reach him. As from previous arrangements it was expected that General Fagan with Arkansas cavalry had got in Steele's rear, and would impede or prevent his crossing the river, General Smith determined to give battle in the hope of being able to capture the whole Federal army. Therefore the Southern forces waded into the overflow of the river, and on April 30th attacked the enemy. The fighting under such circumstances was terrible and destructive. It did not move Steele from his position, and General Fagan's cavalry, from some accident, did not appear on the opposite bank, but the hot fight gave General Steele's forces such a warning as induced him to abandon meeting his friends at Shreveport. In that battle we lost two generals and other good officers and men, and many others were wounded, and it was r