Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for D. M. Fairfax or search for D. M. Fairfax in all documents.

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om into the cabin, where he was arrested by Mr. Fairfax, and was then brought by Mr. Hall and Mr. GMr. Eustis came to the boat, accompanied by Mr. Fairfax. I then, by his order, took charge of the rder to the marines was countermanded by Lieutenant Fairfax. Mr. Slidell was removed to the boat by ssity. Mr. Mason was taken in charge by Lieutenant Fairfax and Third Assistant Engineer Hall. The ce. I then received an order from both Lieutenants Fairfax and Greer to retain the boat until Messance. He shortly returned and delivered Lieutenant Fairfax's order that I should come on board wither. He went in the cabin. Soon afterward Lieut. Fairfax ordered me to wait on Mr. Slidell to the b, in the third cutter, to the assistance of Mr. Fairfax; at two he returned, bringing Messrs. Slideght if she did, and Bravo. ) She did strike Mr. Fairfax. ( Loud cheers for her then. ) She did striy forcibly, for I do not say a word against Mr. Fairfax, so far as his manner is concerned — he att[54 more...]
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 147. drawing Lots at Richmond, Va. (search)
were drawn: account by an officer. Richmond prison, Va., Nov. 11, 1861. sir: This lets you know that I am in as good health and spirits as could be expected under confinement so long. It is now sixteen weeks since I was taken, with many more, on the battle-field at Bull Run, and since that many more have been taken and brought here. They number in all, who have been brought to Richmond, as many as two thousand six to seven hundred. Some arrived as late as last night — a few from Fairfax and Leesburg; arid before, over 700 from the Leesburg battle of the 21st of October, and on the north side of the Potomac, which no doubt you have got the news of. I think that through and by the same flag of truce that this comes, other versions and the details of the battle will be sent by officers in full knowledge of the facts, from the spot, which of course you will become acquainted with. There is one thing I wish to let you know, which is this: the General in charge of this post,
ar, when the cannonade commenced. For an hour and a half the two steamers poured shell into the woods. From the balloon I could see the shells burst over the tops of the trees and near the surrounding buildings. Some struck the residence of Mr. Fairfax, situated in a grove upon the hill. Fairfax is said to be a Colonel in the rebel army. The wagons moved away as quick as possible, and several mounted officers scampered off as well. The booming of the cannon aroused the camps, and hundreFairfax is said to be a Colonel in the rebel army. The wagons moved away as quick as possible, and several mounted officers scampered off as well. The booming of the cannon aroused the camps, and hundreds of our men covered the hills on the Maryland side, from which the whole action could be seen. While the vessels were firing into the woods, our guns at Budd's Ferry sent a few shells across. The rebel batteries directly opposite, at Shipping Point, returned the fire. Several of their shells exploded on this side without doing any damage, and one of ours burst right in their upper battery. The rebels ran in every direction. In the mean time I had descended in the balloon and embarked