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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for D. Mc. N. Fairfax or search for D. Mc. N. Fairfax in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 7: the Trent affair. (search)
her to. Our captain hailed her and said he would send a boat on board, and gave an order to Lieut. Fairfax to board her. Fairfax went in the second cutter. At the same time Lieut. Greer was all readFairfax went in the second cutter. At the same time Lieut. Greer was all ready in the third cutter to shove off from the port side, in case his services should be needed. On coming alongside of the packet, Lieut. Fairfax ordered the other officers to remain in the boat witLieut. Fairfax ordered the other officers to remain in the boat with the crew until it should become necessary to use force, and he went on board the Trent alone. The captain of the mail steamer refused to show his papers and passenger list, knowing very well the obell remarking that it would require considerable force to take him on board the San Jacinto. Lieut. Fairfax then ordered Mr. Houston to return to the San Jacinto and report that the Confederate Commissioners were taken out of the Trent. The whole matter on board the Trent was conducted by Lieut. Fairfax with the utmost courtesy. He had a very unpleasant duty to perform, especially as he was mu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
iel Ammen. 5. New Ironsides Captain T. Turner. 6. Catskill Commander G. W. Rodgers. 7. Nantucket Commander D. M Fairfax. 8. Nahant Commander John Downes. 9. Keokuk Commander A. C. Rhind. A squadron of vessels, of which Captain Jble to use it again during the action. His turret, also, became jammed, although he Commander (now Rear-Admiral) D. Mc. N. Fairfax. was finally enabled to get it in motion again. Commander Ammen, of the Patapsco, lost the use of his rifled-gun after the fifth fire, owing to the carrying away of the bolts of the forward cap-square. Commander Fairfax, of the Nantucket, reports that after the third shot from the 15-inch gun, the port-stopper became jammed, several shot striking near the port McNary; Third-Assistants, W. W. Buckhout, J. K. Smedley and Acting-Third-Assistant A. L. Grow. [Commander Donald McN. Fairfax commanded the Nantucket at Charleston.] Iron-clad steamer Catskill. [Jan. 1864.] Lieutenant-Commander, F. M. Bu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
ced his advance upon Charleston by the movement of troops to Folly Island on July 3d, 1863, where they remained concealed as much as possible, and erected batteries to command those of the enemy on the south end of Morris Island. With the foregoing explanations, we will proceed to relate what followed, namely, the attack on the enemy's works by the Army and Navy. At 4 A. M. of July 10th, 1863, four iron-clads — the Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers, Montauk, Commander Donald McN. Fairfax, Nahant, Commander John Downes, and the Weehawken, Commander E. R. Colhoun, passed over the bar, the flag of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren flying on the Catskill. One hour later, at 5 A. M., General Gillmore made an attack on the Confederate fortified positions on the south end of Morris Island, and after an engagement of three hours and a quarter he had captured all the enemy's works upon that part of the island, and pushed forward his infantry to within six hundred yards of Fort Wagner. As the