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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Thomas Falconer or search for Thomas Falconer in all documents.

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
or Westminster. place, about six miles from town. I breakfasted with Roebuck, and then with him went to the member for Westminster. There were only Leader, Trelawney, Captain E. J. Trelawney.—author of Adventures of a Younger Son,— Roebuck, Falconer,—late editor of the Westminster Review,—and myself. We talked till midnight, meeting early at breakfast the next morning; and I did not leave Leader's till it was time for me to go to town to dress for dinner at Sir Robert Inglis's,—thus passinent, 1835-1849; was Governor of Hong Kong, 1854-57; and became editor of the Westminster Review by the nomination of Bentham, but against the judgment of James Mill. Autobiography of John Stuart Mill, p. 91. (just returned from Egypt), Roebuck, Falconer, and myself. I was nearly dead with a cold, but I could not be insensible to the bold, searching conversation and the interesting discussions of the characters of public men and events. Brougham said last week to Roebuck: They say there wil
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
, and of public affairs; Kenyon, of society and literary men. Morpeth, who was disinclined to letter-writing, wrote to him from time to time,—always with much affection. Occasional letters came from Sir Charles R. Vaughan; H. Bellenden Ker; Henry Reeve; Abraham Hayward; Alexander Cochrane; Thomas Brown; Mrs. Anne B. Montagu; Edward Rushton, of Liverpool; Edward Dowling, Mr. Dowling went in 1840 to Canada, as legal adviser of the Governor-General, and died there in 1844. and others. Thomas Falconer, who visited Texas, and published a book on the Discovery of the Mississippi, wrote frequently while travelling, and while at home at Putney Hall. From Mittermaier, Foelix, and Julius, he also received tidings, —particularly from Mittermaier, who wrote in German. Fay kept him informed of society in Berlin, and of German politics. J. Randolph Clay wrote from Vienna of affairs in Eastern Europe. His brother George wrote of the public men and politics of France and other countries whic