hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 19 1 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery. 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 9 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 3 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Farnsworth or search for Farnsworth in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 2 document sections:

o be remounted, were drawn upon to help take care of the horses, until their departure for the front. This photograph was taken in May, 1864, when Grant and Lee were grappling in the Wilderness and at Spottsylvania, only seventy miles distant. The inspection of horses for remounting was made by experienced cavalry officers, while the purchasing was under the Quartermaster's Department. Stables for six thousand horses Giesboro, D. C.--one of the busiest spots of the war Merritt and Farnsworth menaced the Confederate left and, according to General Law, Battles and leaders of the Civil War. neutralized the action of Hood's infantry Division of Longstreet's corps by bold use of mounted and dismounted men, contributing in no small degree to the Federal success. In the West, during the same period, the cavalry conditions were not unlike those in the East, except that the field of operations extended over five States instead of two and that numerous bands of independent caval
so weakened the Confederate line in front of General Farnsworth, that Kilpatrick ordered the latter to charge Kilpatrick when he impetuously gave the order to Farnsworth to make the last charge. Farnsworth spoke with eFarnsworth spoke with emotion: General, do you mean it? Shall I throw my handful of men over rough ground, through timber, against a Antietam Newcomers' mill on Antietam creek Farnsworth rose in his stirrups — he looked magnificent in horget it. For a moment there was silence, when Farnsworth spoke calmly, General, if you order the charge, It hear the low conversation that followed, but as Farnsworth turned away, he said, I will obey your order. Ki with it a number of prisoners. When the body of Farnsworth was afterwards recovered, it was found to have re1910, p. 343. The following is the account of Farnsworth's death as seen by a Confederate officer and by httle of Gettysburg, on July 3d, made by a General Farnsworth of the Yankee army. He led his brigade, riding w