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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 138 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 71 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 69 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Early operations in the Gulf. (search)
ff the Passes in the Powhatan.--J. R. S. from which time the department was busily engaged in preparation for the expedition. As a part of the plan, it was decided to divide the Gulf Squadron into two commands, and when, on the 23d of December, Farragut received his preparatory orders, they directed him to hold himself in readiness to take command of the West Gulf Squadron and the expedition to New Orleans. Farragut received his full orders as flag-officer on the 20th of January, 1862, and saiFarragut received his full orders as flag-officer on the 20th of January, 1862, and sailed from Hampton Roads in the Hartford on the 3d of February, arriving at Ship Island on the 20th. The East Gulf Squadron, comprising the vessels on the west coast of Florida, remained under the command of Flag-Officer McKean. On May 10th, 1862, Pensacola was evacuated, and came once more into the possession of the United States. A month later, on June 4th, Flag-Officer McKean was relieved by Captain J. L. Lardner, who was followed by Commodores Theodorus Bailey and C. K. Stribling. Operat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opening of the lower Mississippi. (search)
ould be made to him. On the first sign of war Farragut, though a Southerner by birth and residence, t in 1833, during the nullification troubles, Farragut was sent by Andrew Jackson to South Carolina ve a brief sketch of his early naval life. Farragut was born in Tennessee, from which State his fattention. Mr. Porter died at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Farragut, it being considered dangeroury first man selected. I continually urged Farragut's appointment, and finally the department dirdefenses in the rear. As soon as possible Farragut proceeded to his station and took command of yed at least twelve days. The first act of Farragut was to send Captain Henry H. Bell, his chief-ardous an attack, they waited impatiently for Farragut to come on, resting in the assurance that he the heavy ships over the bar were failures. Farragut felt extremely uncomfortable at the prospect considered it necessary to remove them, with Farragut's permission, to the opposite shore, under co[18 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Brooklyn at the passage of the forts. (search)
r was always the same,--Up the river, sir! Days and weeks went by, and the smoke came no nearer. Once only, on February 24th, it came out of the river, and we had an exciting chase of a blockade-runner, following her for miles, with an officer aloft conning the ship by the smoke seen above the fog; we captured the chase, which proved to be the steamer Magnolia with 1200 bales of cotton. At last the spell was broken, for on the 7th of March the Hartford and Pensacola arrived with Captain D. G. Farragut, then flag-officer commanding the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, and we learned that we were going to open the Mississippi River. I had never met Farragut, but had heard of him from officers who were with him in the Brooklyn on her previous cruise. He had been represented as a man of most determined will and character — a man who would assume any responsibility to accomplish necessary ends. I saw a great deal of him at the Head of the Passes and after we passed the forts. Often
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. The composition, losses, and strength of each force as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing; c for captured. The Union forces. Union fleet: West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Flag-Officer D. G. Farragut. first division of gun-boats, Captain Theodorus Bailey. Second division of gun-boats, Fleet-Captain Henry H. Bell. Union casualties. prior to the action of Apr. 24th. during the action of Apr. 24th. Total Casualties. Killed. Wounded. Total. Killed. Wounded. Total. Hartford   5 5 3 10 13 18 Brooklyn       9 26 35 35 Richmond       2 4 6 6 Pensacola       4 33 37 37 Mississippi       2 6 8 8 Oneida   15 15   3 3 18 Varuna       3 9 12 12 Iroquois   3 3 6 22 28 31 Cayuga         6 6 6 Itasca         4 4 4 Katahdin 1   1       1 K
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Richmond scenes in 1862. (search)
fore Richmond when occasion called, and roughing it in the trenches like a veteran. His cheerful endurance of hardship during a freezing winter of camp life became a proverb in the army later in the siege. For a time nothing was talked of but the capture of New Orleans. Of the midshipman, my brother, we heard that on the day previous to the taking of the forts, after several days' bombardment by the United States fleet under Richmond from the Manchester side of the James. Flag-Officer Farragut, he had been sent in charge of ordnance and deserters to a Confederate vessel in the river; that Lieutenant R----, a friend of his, on the way to report at Fort Jackson during the hot shelling, had invited the lad to accompany him by way of a pleasure trip; that while they were crossing the moat around Fort Jackson, in a canoe, and under heavy fire, a thirteen-inch mortar-shell had struck the water near, half filling their craft; and that, after watching the fire from this point for
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
teel. Every true man likes to attribute high qualities to those who were once friends, though now alienated for a time. The temporary estrangement cannot obliterate the recollection of noble traits of character. Some one attempted to condole with Tom Yearwood, a famous old South Carolina bully, upon the beating given him by his own son. Hush up, said old Tom. I am glad that no one but my own flesh and blood had a hand in my drubbing. The sons of the South struck her many heavy blows. Farragut, of Tennessee, rose, as a reward of merit, to the highest rank in the Federal navy. A large number of his associates were from the South. In the Federal army there were of Southern blood and lineage Generals Thomas, Sykes, Reno, Newton, J. J Reynolds, Canby, Ord, Brannan, William Nelson, Crittenden, Blair, R. W. Johnson, T. J. Wood, N. B. Buford, Terrill, Graham, Davidson, Cooke, Alexander, Getty, French, Fremont, Pope, Hunter. Some of these doubtless served the South better by the side
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
ive him command of the Army of the West, since Van Dorn had been sent by order of the President to relieve Lovell in the command at Vicksburg, then threatened by Farragut's fleet. Halleck, as has been said, began to move his army toward Chattanooga immediately after occupying Corinth. One of his last acts, before laying down horn at Vicksburg did not have any available force at that time, or for many weeks afterward. With the assistance of the gun-boat Arkansas he had demonstrated to Farragut the impracticability of taking Vicksburg without the cooperation of a large land force, and had caused him to return to New Orleans with his fleet, and Davis's and Ellet's to retire up the river, and on July 27th, the very day on which Farragut withdrew, he ordered Breckinridge to proceed at once to Baton Rouge with five thousand picked men and occupy that place. For accounts of operations about Vicksburg see Vol. III. of this work.--Editors. A series of misadventures had followed tha
of the most vivid of any war. A Confederate Secret service photograph of the first Indiana heavy Artillery This remarkable photograph is here published for the first time. It is but one of the many made by A. D. Lytle in Baton Rouge during its occupancy by the Federals. With a courage and skill as remarkable as that of Brady himself this Confederate photographer risked his life to obtain negatives of Federal batteries, cavalry regiments and camps, lookout towers, and the vessels of Farragut and Porter, in fact of everything that might be of the slightest use in informing the Confederate Secret Service of the strength of the Federal occupation of Baton Rouge. In Lytle's little shop on Main Street these negatives remained in oblivion for near half a century. War photographs were long regarded with extreme disfavor in the South and the North knew nothing of Lytle's collection, which has at last been unearthed by the editors of the Photographic history. The value of Lytle's wor
ich led the Confederates to believe the position strongly occupied and delayed Longstreet's advance long enough for troops to be rushed forward to meet it. The picture tells all too plainly at what sacrifice the height was finally held. Admiral Farragut, while accepting the armored vessels as possessing certain advantages and as apparently a necessity of modern warfare, had the impatience of the old-fashioned sailor against any such attempt at protection. He preferred for himself the old t holes. But when a shell makes its way into one of those damned teakettles, it can't get out again. It sputters round inside doing all kinds of mischief. It must be borne in mind, apart from the natural exaggeration of such an utterance, that Farragut was speaking half a century ago, in the time of slow-velocity missiles. His phrase damned tea-kettles came, however, to be the general descriptive term for the ironclads, applied not only by the men in the ranks but by the naval men themselves.
ton Rouge-1862 those in South Africa, and it was impossible in the circumstances that they could be, was the result of the blockade of the Southern coast, a force the South was powerless to resist. What has been said shows how clear was the role of the navy. The strategic situation was of the simplest; to deprive the South of its intercourse with Europe and in addition to cut the Confederacy in twain through the control of the Mississippi. The latter, gained largely by the battles of Farragut, Porter, Foote, and Davis, was but a part of the great scheme of blockade, as it cut off the supply of food from Texas and the shipments of material which entered that State by way of Matamoras. The question of the military control of Texas could be left aside so long as its communications were cut, for in any case the State would finally have to yield with the rest of the Confederacy. The many thousand troops which would have been an invaluable reenforcement to the Southern armies in the
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