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J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 10 (search)
stamp of character, for never did there exist a purer people. December 24 I am at work on the resolution passed by Congress. The Secretary sent it to me, with an order to prepare the list of names, and saying that he would explain the grounds upon which they were permitted to depart. I can only give the number registered in this office. December 25 Mr. Ely, the Yankee member of Congress, who has been in confinement here since the battle of Manassas, has been exchanged for Mr. Faulkner, late Minister to France, who was captured on his return from Europe. Mr. Ely smiled at the brown paper on which I had written his passport. I told him it was Southern manufacture, and although at present in a crude condition, it was in the process of improvement, and that necessity was the mother of invention. The necessity imposed on us by the blockade would ultimately redound to our advantage, and might injure the country inflicting it by diminishing its own products. He smiled aga
h, and I moved them out at a lively pace in pursuit, followed by a section of the battery. No halt was called till we came upon the enemy's main body, under Colonel Faulkner, drawn up in line of battle near Newland's store. Opening on him with the two pieces of artillery, I hurriedly formed line confronting him, and quickly and with but little resistance drove him in confusion from the field. The sudden turning of the tables dismayed Faulkner's men, and panic seizing them, they threw away every loose article of arms or clothing of which they could dismember themselves, and ran in the wildest disorder in a mad effort to escape. As the chase went on the panic increased, the clouds of dust from the road causing an intermingling of friend and foe. In a little while the affair grew most ludicrous, Faulkner's hatless and coatless men taking to the woods in such dispersed order and so demoralized that a good many prisoners were secured, and those of the enemy who escaped were hunted u
, probably a half-hour after the first gun was fired, Colonel Faulkner was ordered to move his regiment, the Seventh Kentuck massing his forces to make an irresistible dash upon Colonel Faulkner and his gallant command, he was ordered to retire to uring the course of the night. He was accompanied by Colonel Faulkner, of the Seventh Kentucky. About two miles from town,nce, protected at all points by heavy stone fencing. Colonel Faulkner obtained permission to take two companies of the Foure prettiest cavalry dash of the war. It was here that Colonel Faulkner received his severe and painful wound. Our pardonablis casualty. Two of our most dashing leaders (Cooper and Faulkner) were placed hors du combat, and our entire little army jir commands. As the news spread from mouth to mouth that Faulkner was killed, (such being at first the erroneous report,) if the country. In the reconnoissance of the fifth, Colonel Faulkner, commanding the Seventh Kentucky, (being part of Colo
that could not be excelled by the most experienced and veteran troops. At no time was there any confusion. At no time was there any wavering. From the commencement to the end of the charge the alignment of the line of battle was wonderfully preserved. My hearty commendation and profound thanks are especially due to the officers and men of my command, for their brave and gallant conduct on this occasion. As I was deprived of the assistance of my able and energetic field-officer Lieutenant-Colonel Faulkner, being absent on detached service in the State of New-York, and Major Arnold being detained at Bridgeport by an attack of illness, which rendered him unable to take the field, there is no occasion to make special mention of any officer or man of my command, for every one engaged seemed to perform his whole duty. No one faltered — there were no stragglers. All are alike entitled to credit — all alike should receive the commendation of their superior officers, the gratitude
part of the United States to seize them in the streets of London would have been as well founded as that to apprehend them where they were taken. Had they been malefactors, and citizens even of the United States, they could not have been arrested on a British ship or on British soil unless under the express provisions of a treaty, and according to the forms therein provided for the extradition of criminals. But rights the most sacred seem to have lost all respect in their eyes. When Mr. Faulkner, a former Minister of the United States to France, commissioned before the secession of Virginia, his native State, returned in good faith to Washington to settle his accounts and fulfil all the obligations into which he had entered, he was perfidiously arrested and imprisoned in New York, where he now is. The unsuspecting confidence with which he reported to his Government was abused, and his desire to fulfil his trust to them was used to his injury. In conducting this war, we have so
en Mr. Ely was released he went, in company with Mr. Faulkner, to the jail, and the two were granted the favor of an interview with the unfortunate officers. Mr. Faulkner expressed his surprise at this rigor, and he stay thinks that, based upon this last statement by Mr. Faulkner, the rebel authorities will lessen the severity ed to use their efforts to get him exchanged for Mr. Faulkner. The following day he saw announced in a Richmond paper that Mr. Faulkner had been released on his parole for thirty days, on condition that he should proceenal day's intelligence announced the progress of Mr. Faulkner, he became convinced that his release was near at hand. Mr. Faulkner was received in Richmond with a perfect ovation, thirty thousand people being out. The following day Mr. Faulkner called upon Mr. Ely, and they had a pleasant interview, and, having both been pris departure. At five o'clock in the afternoon, Mr. Faulkner again called at the prison with Gov. Letcher's c
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore), Contents of Thie first volume. (search)
st Convention in Georgia,179 125.Gen. Harney's Letter,179 126.Albany Burgess Corps,181 127.South Carolina College Cadets,181 128.Religious Press on the War,181 129.Gov. Letcher's Proclamation, May 3,184 130.New York to be Burned,185 131.President's Proclamation,185 132.Commodore Stewart's Letter to Childs,186 133.Rebel Army at Pensacola,187 134.The Attack on Washington, Nat. Intelligencer,188 135.Maryland Commissioners' Report,190 136.New Jersey Troops--List of Officers,191 137.Faulkner, Dayton, and Seward's Correspondence,192 138.President Lincoln's Letter to Marylanders,193 139.Tilghman and Prentiss' Interview,194 140. Confederate Declaration of War,195 141.Patriotic Fund Contributions,197 142.20th Regiment N. Y. S. M. (Ulster Co.),198 143.Reverdy Johnson's Speech at Frederick, Md.,199 144.Tennessee League,201 145.Edward Everett's Address at Roxbury, Mass.,205 146.Gen. Butler's Orders at Relay House,208 146 1/2.Motley's Letter on Causes of the War,209 147.Sece
This time, however, they did not run without firing a gun; but they might as well have done so, for when they turned in their saddles and emptied their rifles, they only endangered the life of their gallant leader, who was thus between two fires. On his return, Col. Metcalfe was so disgusted with his regiment, that he refused to have any thing more to do with such a pack of arrant cowards, whereupon Lieut.-Col. Odin followed his example, leaving the fragment of the command in charge of Major Faulkner, a brave and dashing officer, who would have retrieved the disgrace into which his men had fallen, if there had been any fight in them. The rebel cavalry, accompanied by a few six-pound howitzers, each drawn by a single mule, continued to advance toward Rogersville, a little village about five miles south of Richmond, where they were met by a section of Andrews's Michigan battery and the brigade of Brig.-General Manson, composed of the Fifty-fifth, Sixty-sixth, Sixty-ninth and Sevent
This time, however, they did not run without firing a gun; but they might as well have done so, for when they turned in their saddles and emptied their rifles, they only endangered the life of their gallant leader, who was thus between two fires. On his return, Col. Metcalfe was so disgusted with his regiment, that he refused to have any thing more to do with such a pack of arrant cowards, whereupon Lieut.-Col. Odin followed his example, leaving the fragment of the command in charge of Major Faulkner, a brave and dashing officer, who would have retrieved the disgrace into which his men had fallen, if there had been any fight in them. The rebel cavalry, accompanied by a few six-pound howitzers, each drawn by a single mule, continued to advance toward Rogersville, a little village about five miles south of Richmond, where they were met by a section of Andrews's Michigan battery and the brigade of Brig.-General Manson, composed of the Fifty-fifth, Sixty-sixth, Sixty-ninth and Sevent
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Forrest of operations against W. Sooy Smith in February, 1864. (search)
a courier reported the enemy as having crossed the river eight miles above Ellis' bridge, destroying mills and taking horses and negroes. With five companies of Faulkner's regiment and my escort, I moved rapidly to the point, clearly designated by the smoke of the burning mill, gained the bridge, and succeeded in capturing the sqgreatly protected his men, and our casualties during this fight were seven men wounded. As the enemy withdrew, I followed them with my escort and a portion of Faulkner's regiment mounted; also with a section of Morton's battery, supported by a regiment from McCulloch's brigade on foot. Our advance at first was necessarily slowidly as possible, two thousand of his best mounted men and Hoole's battery of Mountain howitzers. I soon came on their rear guard, charged it with my escort and Faulkner's command, and drove it before me. They made several stands; but Colonel McCulloch, with his brigade, having caught up, we continued to charge and drive them on,
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