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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 102 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 11 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for W. S. Featherston or search for W. S. Featherston in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 4 document sections:

; and Kearney and Welborn, Eighteenth, having exhausted their ammunition, gave the enemy the bayonet; and the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Mississippi, under Colonel Featherston and Lieut.-Col. T. M. Griffin, drove the foe, fighting desperately, back to Ball's Bluff on the river, where the main body surrendered, only a fragment of tled with the bayonet by my men. The loss of the Eighteenth, the largest of any command in action on the Confederate line, was 22 killed and 63 wounded. Colonel Featherston, of the Seventeenth, in his report mentioned with praise the service of Lieut.-Col. John McQuirk, field officer of the day; Major Lyle, who acted as lieutenant record of Captain Duff. In the last charge which crowned our success and completed the discomfiture of the enemy, no troops could have behaved better, wrote Featherston of the Seventeenth. The whole line marched forward in the most admirable order upon a vastly superior force, reserving their fire until within the most effectiv
Culbertson's Mississippi battery; Capt. J. J. Cowan's Mississippi battery; Captain McLendon's Mississippi battery. Featherston's brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston —Third Mississippi, Col. T. H. Mellon; Twenty-second Mississippi, Lieut.-Col. road and turned upon him two captured batteries. These Withers opened upon from a ridge opposite, and silenced them. Featherston also came up, and was put in position to cover the retreat which was now ordered. Major Lockett having provided a nd Bowen and Loring were not sent up till afternoon, Bowen alone arriving at 2:30, when it was evidently too late, and Featherston and Buford not until 4 p. m. The men in these commands demonstrated their readiness to fight as soon as they were per Tilghman's Mississippi brigade lost 5 killed, o wounded, 42 missing; Buford's brigade lost 11 killed and 49 wounded; Featherston's brigade 2 wounded and 1 captured. On the Federal side the main loss was sustained by Hovey's division, which lost a
s of the enemy, with heavy loss to the Federals. Featherston's skirmishers, the First battalion, under Major S Colonel Barry. At Peachtree Creek, July 20th, Featherston's brigade charged the enemy and drove him from tht on the center with great spirit. The loss of Featherston's brigade, 616 out of an effective total of 1,230he Thirty-third, a gallant and excellent officer, Featherston wrote, fell beyond the enemy's first line of workade was magnificent, but it was fatal, as that of Featherston's had been two days before. The Eighth Mississipline they held after the battle of the 28th, with Featherston's division, in which were the Mississippi brigadecolor-bearers of the Third and Twenty-second, General Featherston reported, planted their colors on the enemy'sded. During the retreat General Walthall, with Featherston's brigade and several others, Featherston's brigaFeatherston's brigade including seven Mississippi regiments, now having an effective total of 411, formed the infantry of the famo
pomattox under Captain Cherry, numbered 20 officers and 231 men; Davis' brigade had 21 officers and 54 men; and Harris' brigade had 33 officers and 339 men. Meanwhile the Mississippi infantry of the armies of Tennessee and Mississippi had joined the forces under Gen. J. E. Johnston for the defense of the Carolinas. Loring's division was there, forming part of Stewart's corps of three divisions, one of which was commanded by Walthall. The whole corps contained only 1,000 fighting men. Featherston's brigade, reinforced by part of several Arkansas regiments, included heroic fragments of the Third, Thirty-first, and Fortieth Mississippi, under Col. James M. Stigler; the First, Twenty-second and Thirty-third regiments and First battalion, under Col. Martin A. Oatis; and the Twenty-seventh, Maj. Q. C. Heidelburg. The brigade of Gen. Robert Lowry contained the Fifth, Fourteenth and Forty-third, consolidated under Col. Robert J. Lawrence; and the Sixth, Fifteenth, Twentieth and Twenty-t