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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 17 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for Featherston or search for Featherston in all documents.

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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
thing, and then reappeared, carrying the bundle of wet clothes, and he and the child walked away hand in hand to camp—then there were more tears, manly, noble, purifying tears; and I heard the sergeant say, Faith! the captain has fulfilled his pledge to that boy. My friends, hear the plea of the orphan: I am alone in the world. How will you answer it? What will you do with it? Will you pass my noble Georgian's pledge to take him up? Will you keep it as he kept it? A missionary to Featherston's Mississippi Brigade writes of conducting religious services while the pickets were fighting heavily six hundred yards in front, and with balls falling all around. Preaching was heard with eagerness, penitents were numerous, and seventeen young converts were baptized. I knew of several instances on the Petersburg lines where men were wounded in congregations which remained quiet while the preacher continued his sermon. We were blessed with a comparatively quiet Sabbath at Cold Har
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
classes, and are wielding a fine influence for the cause of Christ. At Adams' Mississippi brigade preached once; attentive audience. Seventyfive men were seeking salvation, and many professed conversion. I baptized four young soldiers. Featherston's Mississippi brigade has been blessed with a very gracious revival for two or three weeks; over one hundred have joined the Church recently. I have preached for them once. Colonel Stehpens, commanding brigade, and other officers, gave me a dying. Both of these brave men testify that they are resigned to death. How much good grew out of the great revival in their brigade a few weeks ago God only knows. Atlanta, July 20. Heavy artillery firing. Severe loss in the brigades of Featherston, Scott, Reynolds' Arkansas and Stephens' Georgia. General Stephens severely wounded. I talked with a soldier, Fifty-third Alabama Cavalry, horribly mangled. His parents not religious, and he has made no profession, but is praying, and says h