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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 17 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 4 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Featherston or search for Featherston in all documents.

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ning of the 21st., before the full extent of our victory was ascertained. The battle commanded early Monday morning, and lasted throughout the day. The Yankees crossed the Potomac the previous night, and continued to come over in large numbers as the fight progressed until from eight to ten thousand were landed on the Virginia side. They were met by the forces under Gen. Evans, with the 8th Virginia regiment, Col. Hunton the 13th Mississippi, Colonel Barksdale; the 17th Mississippi, Colonel Featherston, and the 18th Mississippi, Colonel Burt.--The engagement very soon became general, and the fighting was terrible on both sides, the Yankees being protected by a heavy forest and having the advantage in ground and position. They were routed three distinct times at the point of the bayonet, and as often heavily reinforced. In one charge the 8th Virginia captured a splendid brass battery, and put its men to inglorious flight. The enemy were finally pursued to the river's brink, where,