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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
to slavery, and friendly to moral reforms. Felton, while applauding Sumner's Fourth of July oratears of ever increasing usefulness and honor. Felton wrote: Mr. Everett spoke of your oration in suse. He [Sumner] passed the night with us; and Felton came up. In tone and sentiment it followed fit were not quite so sad as I am disposed to be. Felton says my address is very fine. How says it wilted, in 1850, one point of difference was that Felton, in a note to Sumner, had expressed his profouhe Blind Asylum, could rarely meet with them. Felton, in a note to Sumner written early in 1846, mot the Asylum for the Blind with Dr. Howe, Professor Felton, and a few others. After that I lost no speak sadly of his loneliness. Some of them, Felton and How, bade him marry, telling him it was ti To Longfellow he wrote April 15, 1840, after Felton's engagement for his second marriage: I do feeaturist. Friendly notes came often from Howe, Felton, and Longfellow. Death and change of interest[2 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
icknor, Everett, Prescott, Sparks, Holmes, and Felton; divines like Moses Stuart and Leonard Woods. had no classical authority. This brought Professor Felton into the controversy, who defended Webste newspaper articles, but avoided an issue with Felton. Boston Transcript, July 29 and Aug. 2, 185umner, Sept. 27, 1846, on his second marriage, Felton wrote: I read your note with feelings that I cThey exchanged all sorts of friendly offices. Felton read Sumner's addresses in manuscript, was alwas awaited no other guest. Sumner was fond of Felton's children, and remembered them with Christmasught that Sumner should be more considerate of Felton, and bear in mind his facility of nature, and Longfellow wrote in his diary, April 8, 1850: Felton is quite irritated with Sumner about politics.riends. The separation lasted till 1856, when Felton, at a public meeting in Cambridge called to copersonal intercourse and correspondence, until Felton's death in 1862. The Free Soilers of Massac[3 more...]
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
onal and humane sentiment than these demonstrations indicated, which was suppressed by the terrorism of the time. Professor Felton, in two letters to Sumner, written Nov. 8 and 10, 1860, represented that Southern opinion, even in South Carolina, dsses were made by Joel Parker, Theophilus Parsons, and Willard Phillips, three well known jurists; Sparks, the historian; Felton, Felton, who had been separated from Sumner since 1850, at a dinner on the day after hearing of the assault, proposed Felton, who had been separated from Sumner since 1850, at a dinner on the day after hearing of the assault, proposed as a toast, The re-election of Charles Sumner. (Longfellow's Journal and Letters, vol. II. p. 280.) In his speech he stated his opposition to Sumner at the time of his election, and said that now if he had live hundred votes, every one should be gih him, avoided him, and his fellowships were only with his own party and section. His black hair turned to gray, President Felton, who at Washington in his connection with the Smithsonian Institution, so wrote to Sumner, Nov. 8, 1860, and gave Me
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
central column, not as an extension to that region of the malady of the latter, nor as an independent local disease of those nerves. In June and July Sumner passed the greater part of the time in his bed, unable even to take the air in a drive. He saw few persons, as it was difficult for him to move about; and indeed lie had little heart for society. Among his American callers were Mr. Woods,—always ready with kind offices for him, as for all fellow-countrymen,—William C. Bryant, Professor Felton, George Bemis, Thomas N. Dale, and Mrs. Ritchie of Boston; and among English friends full of sympathy whom he met were Mr. and Mrs. Grote, Madame du Quaire, Madame Molh, Mr. and Mrs. Browning, and Mrs. Jameson. He wrote to Longfellow, July 19; My chief solace latterly has been in seeing Mrs. Jameson, whose conversation is clear, instructive, and most friendly, and in the Brownings; all of these have been full of kindness for me, and I like them all very much. In August he passed a da
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
rs, and the reformers of the sixteenth century. Milton justified a sanctified bitterness against the enemies of truth. Whittier wrote of the speech: There is something really awful in its Rhadamanthine severity of justice; but it was needed. Felton, on the other hand, in a friendly letter to Sumner, took exception to it as harsh and too sweeping in its treatment of slaveholding society. There was now no disposition among the Southern men, at least among members of Congress, to resort agetts were chiefly the old opponents of the Conscience Whigs,—Winthrop, Eliot, Stevenson, G. T. Curtis, Walley, and Hillard. Some of these leaders are described in the New York Tribune; September 17, and the Boston Atlas and Bee, September 28. Felton, at this time President of Harvard College, and George Ticknor voted for Bell and Everett. The Whig conservatism of Boston had been broken up; but a remnant of five thousand votes was given in the city for Bell and Everett, principally cast by vo