Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Ferguson or search for Ferguson in all documents.

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the 13th regulars, lie helped beat off the assailants, and moved on; reaching Corinth that night. But the Rebels did not seem reconciled to his movements, and were constantly infesting Osterhaus's division, who held the advance, supported by Morgan L. Smith's, both under the command of Frank Blair, as well as John E. Smith's, which covered the working parties engaged in repairing the railroad; so that the movement had to be made circumspectly and slowly. Stephen D. Lee, with Roddy's and Ferguson's brigades, made up a force of about 5,000 irregular cavalry, who were constantly watching for chances to do mischief; and, though not strong enough to be perilous, they were so lively as to be vexatious. At length, they got directly in the way at Cane creek, Oct. 27. near Tuscumbia, compelling Blair to hurt some of them before they would move. By this time — Hooker having long since arrived on the Tennessee — Grant had become impatient for more decisive operations, and a messenger rea
erson creek prisoners and a considerable portion of his own men and horses. Col. Gallup, commanding on the border of eastern Kentucky, surprised Feb. 12. Col. Ferguson, a Rebel guerrilla, at the Rock House, Wayne co., West Virginia, killing 15 and taking 50 prisoners, including Ferguson. Gen. Scammon, commanding at CharlesFerguson. Gen. Scammon, commanding at Charlestown, had been surprised and captured, with the steamboat Levi, on the Kanawha, by Lt. Verdigan, one of Ferguson's subordinates, a few days before. Verdigan, with but 10 men, captured a General, 4 other officers, and 25 privates, beside the steamboat and her crew; throwing overboard the captured arms so fast as lie could seize thFerguson's subordinates, a few days before. Verdigan, with but 10 men, captured a General, 4 other officers, and 25 privates, beside the steamboat and her crew; throwing overboard the captured arms so fast as lie could seize them, so as to preclude the danger of a rescue. Scammon and his two aids were sent prisoners to Richmond; the residue paroled. Gen. Grant's comprehensive plan of campaign embraced a cooperative movement up the Shenandoah under Gen. Sigel, and up the Kanawha by Gen. Crook, aiming at the Rebel resources in the vicinity of Staunto