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dria, and employ the division in hunting and exterminating these marauders. Elliott reached Alexandria on the eighteenth, and on the twenty-seventh reports that his scouts met those of Burnside on Hint Ridge, cast of Sparta, and that Lieutenant-Colonel Brownlow, with detachments from the First East-Tennessee and Ninth Pennsylvania cavalry, attacked the rebel Colonel Murray on the twenty-sixth at Sparta, killing one, wounding two, and capturing ten of the enemy, including a lieutenant of Champ Ferguson's; he also captured a few horses and ammunition, and destroyed extensive salt-works used by the rebels. A company of scouts under Captain Brixir also encountered a party of guerrillas near Beersheba Springs, captured fifteen or twenty and dispersed the rest. Brigadier-General R. S. Granger reports from Nashville, November second, that a mixed command, under Lieutenant-Colonel Scully, First Middle Tennessee infantry, sent out from Nashville, attacked and defeated Hawkins and other guerr
undred and fifty men, attacked Tracy City on the twentieth, and after having three times summoned the garrison to surrender, were handsomely repulsed by our forces. Colonel T. J. Harrison, Thirty-ninth Indiana, (mounted infantry,) reports from Cedar Grove, twenty-first instant, that he had sent an expedition of two hundred men to Sparta, to look after the guerrillas in that vicinity. They divided into five parties, concentrating at Sparta, having passed over the localities of Carter's, Champ Ferguson's, Bledsoe's, and Murray's guerrillas. His (Harrison's) force remained on the Calf-Killer five days, and during that time killed four, (4,) wounded five or six, and captured fifteen, (15,) including a captain and lieutenant, thirty (30) horses, and twenty stand of arms. The Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad, having been completed on the fourteenth instant, and trains running regularly from Nashville to this point, steps were immediately taken to commence repairing the East-Tennessee
, and formed a junction with Forrest, whose force was thus augmented to six thousand. Our single brigade had consequently to hold its ground and await reenforcements. These arrived next day, Colonel Mizener's brigade having been sent down from Collierville. For two days the pursuit was continued, but necessarily with caution, as Forrest's force was known to be yet superior to ours. When near Holly Springs, reliable information was brought in that the enemy's main column, reenforced by Ferguson's division, had left the Taylor plantation, twelve miles west from Holly Springs, and were yet moving south, having ten hours start of us. The pursuit was here abandoned, and our column, tired out by nearly two weeks of unceasing active service, turned back, and moved by easy stages toward Collierville and Memphis. It is known that, on the seventh instant, the entire rebel force was near Camden, Miss. It is likely they will remain there until they eat up the two hundred beeves they sto
ad skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry at intervals until we arrived at Jackson. The cavalry belonged to S. D. Lee and Ferguson's commands. These skirmishes, though in some cases severe, caused our forces but little delay, as they speedily drove ter the command of Generals Loring and French, and five thousand cavalry, under the command of S. D. Lee, Wirt Adams, and Ferguson. In an advantageous position this force, if concentrated, might perhaps have made a stand and caused us considerable deth considerable loss. Their forces, consisting of about seven thousand men, commanded by Generals Wirt Adams, Ross, and Ferguson, and the whole under command of General S. D. Lee, then fell back to a commanding position on the west side of Baker's Con and capture being estimated at over six hundred. Among the prisoners are Lieutenant Tomlinson, of the rebel Brigadier-General Ferguson's staff and Lieutenant Winn, the rebel conscription officer at Jackson. The deserters who flocked to our lines
camp Louisa, Lawrence Co., Ky., Feb. 20, 1864. On the twelfth instant our District Commander, Colonel Gallup, with his usual sympathy for suffering Unionists, sent a scout over into Western Virginia to rid the citizens of the unscrupulous Colonel Ferguson, who, with his plundering band, had pillaged the country until even the women and children were brought to starvation. This impudent rebel, knowing that Virginia was not in this district, and therefore not under the protection of our gallannois; Lieutenant Griswold, of the Thirteenth Virginia; and a private whose name has escaped me. Fifty prisoners were taken, sixteen Union prisoners released, eighty stand of arms captured, with all their ammunition, horses, and subsistance. Colonel Ferguson was captured apart from the command by Stephen Wheeler, a private of company G. In the battle of Rock House such accurate and fatal shooting was done, that of sixteen wounded men, only two are now living, and one must die; the counties of W