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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 29 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. D. Ferguson or search for J. D. Ferguson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel W. C. Wickham's report of an engagement near Aldie, 17th of June, 1863. (search)
Colonel W. C. Wickham's report of an engagement near Aldie, 17th of June, 1863. Headquarters Fourth Va. Cavalry, June 20th, 1863. Captain J. D. Ferguson, A. A. G. Lee's Brigade: Captain,--I submit the following report of the part taken by the troops under my command in the engagement near Aldie on the 17th instant. I was ordered to take my own regiment, the First and Fifth, and Breathed's battery through Middleburg to Aldie, and go into camp there, where I would find the rest of the brigade. On reaching Dover Mills, I ordered Colonel Rosser to go on to Aldie and select a camp, and whilst the other regiments were watering, received a dispatch from him to the effect that a regiment of the enemy's cavalry was in his front, between him and Aldie, and that he was about to attack them. I at once placed the Fourth regiment in position to cover my left flank on the road from the Snickersville pike, and with the First regiment and two of Breathed's guns went forward to the supp
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Capture of General Seammon. (search)
f Lieutenant Vertigan, the gallant young officer who boarded the boat with only twelve men. Colonel Ferguson, whom I sent with his regiment, the Sixteenth Virginia cavalry, to the lower Kanawha, some lly Lieutenant Vertigan, have performed their duty in the most creditable manner. I sent Colonel Ferguson with his regiment, the Sixteenth Virginia cavalry, to the lower Kanawha, late in December l Letter from Major Nounnan. Logan county, Va., February 7, 1864. General,--I left Colonel Ferguson in Wayne county on the 25th ultimo, with indefinite orders and discretionary powers, and mothe good behavior and daring courage and fortitude of my entire force. I shall report to Colonel Ferguson, in Wayne county, as speedily as possible, and send the prisoners through from this point wd Lyon in charge of Lieutenant Vertigan. The rest will be forwarded as soon as I hear from Colonel Ferguson. Respectfully, your obedient servant, James H. Nounnan, Major, &c. Official. Charles St
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Reams's Station-report of General W. C. Wickham. (search)
Battle of Reams's Station-report of General W. C. Wickham. Headquarters Wickham's brigade, July 2, 1864. Major J. D. Ferguson, A. A. G., Fitz Lee's Cavalry Division: Major,--I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command in the engagement of June 29, 1864, near Reams's Station: Upon reaching Carter's house I was ordered to dismount one of my regiments and send it in to the support of General Lomax, who had been ordered to make a flank attack whilst General Mahone attacked in front; to keep two regiments in hand ready for mounted action, and to put one in rear of our trains to guard them. The Second Virginia cavalry was dismounted, and supported General Lomax in his attack. This attack was followed by a rout. So soon as the enemy began to fly my two mounted regiments (the Third and Fourth Virginia) were thrown forward in the pursuit, passing the park of the enemy's wagons and caissons that they had fired. I made a detail that saved nin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel T. L. Rosser's report of the fight at Aldie. (search)
Colonel T. L. Rosser's report of the fight at Aldie. Headquarters Fifth Virginia cavalry, August 4th, 1863. Captain J. D. Ferguson: Captain,--The brigade leaving Piedmont, in Loudoun county, on the morning of the 17th of June, I was ordered to withdraw my pickets after the column had passed, and followed in the rear. Marching via Paris and Upperville, I arrived at Dover (near Aldie) about 12 or 1 o'clock, finding the brigade going into camp. I received an order from Colonel Wickham, under whose command I had been temporarily placed, to move down the road and select a camp, make my men comfortable, &c. I consequently did so, and when I was just passing the brigade, I met the pickets running in, and the Yankees were rapidly and closely pursuing them. I caused sabres to be drawn, and charged immediately, at the same time sending the information to the rear to the Colonel commanding. I drove the enemy upon his main body, which was in the town of Aldie. His sharp-shooters got
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sherman's advance on Meridian — report of General W. H. Jackson. (search)
of the Yazoo country. At Meridian Adams's brigade was assigned temporarily to Ferguson's division. On the 16th I moved with two brigades towards Columbus, Miss., In this I was successful. On the 28th, having previously assumed command of Ferguson's division, consisting of his own brigade, commanded by Colonel Earle, and Adacommand, viz: Adams's brigade on left flank of enemy, Starke's on right and Ferguson's in rear. In this manner they pursued the enemy to within a short distance oone was executed by the command of Major-General Lee. My thanks are due General Ferguson for his gallantry, energy and prompt compliance with all orders, while temposition, and at this time was joined by General Lee, who informed me that General Ferguson was guarding with his brigade the road leading from Clinton to the bridge,nd I pursued them as rapidly as my jaded horses would permit of my doing. General Ferguson being in their immediate rear I took the upper Vernon road from Canton and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cavalry operations in North Alabama.--report of General S. D. Lee. (search)
nd flat boats were at Eastport crossing troops. There is but little doubt now that a column of the enemy will march north of the Tennessee via Florence and Huntsville. I am in doubt whether the entire force will go by that route. Will inform you as soon as reliable information is received. The force in my front is probably covering the crossing. Some of my scouts still report the enemy working on the railroad east of Bear Creek, and the cars have crossed the Bear Creek bridge. Brigadier General Ferguson attacked and routed the Tory Alabama regiment, and thoroughly scattered it over the country, capturing two pieces of artillery, some forty prisoners, a number of horses, and small arms, &c. Brigadier-General Roddy is still on the flank and rear of the enemy between this point and Big Bear Creek. I am becoming short of ammunition, have sent for a supply at Okalona. My command is not in a condition to remain long from Mississippi, having left prepared only for a two weeks scout aga
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The last days of the Confederate Treasury and what became of its specie. (search)
ith the President, his men being used as scouts, guides and couriers, the cavalry force not traveling as a rule upon the same road as the party. The party proceeded to Charlotte, N. C., where, after a stay of a week (where we heard of the assassination of President Lincoln), the route was taken to Abbeville, S. C. At Charlotte a large accession was made to the cavalry force--General Basil W. Duke with his brigade, General Vaughn and some other detachments from Southwest Virginia, and General Ferguson, and scattering battalions, making quite a full force, which was taken charge of by General John C. Breckinridge in his position as Major-General. General Duke had just before won the most complete victory of his career, attacking and driving away from Marion, Va., a large force of General Stoneman's mounted infantry, who left dead and wounded on the ground, man for man, as many as Duke had under his command in the battle — a brilliant sunset in the closing career of this Kentucky so