Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for S. W. Ferguson or search for S. W. Ferguson in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
Texas; G. G. Lindsey, corn. Camp 232. Flemmingsburg, Ky.; Wm. Stanley, com. Camp 233. Augusta, Ky.; Jno. S. Bradley, corn.; members, 6. Camp 234. Cooper, Texas; Geo. W. Jones, corn. Camp 235. Brookhaven, Miss.; J. A. Haskins, corn. Camp 236. Auburn, Ala.; O. D. Smith, com.; med. offi., J. H. Drake; private; members, 40. Camp 237. Shelbyville, Ky.; Dr. W. F. Beard, com.; med offi., Dr. W. F. Beard, Nov. 21, 1862, surgeon; members, 12. Camp 238. Greenville, Miss.; Gen. S. W. Ferguson, com.; med. offi., D. C. Montgomery, M. D., 1862, surgeon; members, 70. Camp 239. Benham, Texas; D. C. Giddings, corn. Camp 240. Winchester, Va.; W. McVicar, corn. Camp 241. Hopkinsville, Ky.; Nat. Garther, com. Camp 242. Cuero, Texas; V. Weldon, com.; med. offi., Dr. Alexander Irvin; surgeon; members, 89. Camp 243. Brazonie, Texas; Wm. Fort Smith, corn.; med. offi., R. R. Porter; private; members, 36. Camp 244. Dodelo, Fla.; J. F. Highsmith, com. Camp 245. Mem
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
ears over their lifeless clay: Here lie the dead who fought and bled and fell in garbs of gray. Ours the fate of the vanished, whose heartaches never cease. Ours regrets and tears; theirs the eternal peace. Before the unveiling. Assembled Veterans Entertained—March to the monument. The morning dawned cloudy and threatening, A heavy shower fell, but the storm center soon passed away. Visitors had arrived in large numbers during the previous night, among them General S. D. Lee and S. W. Ferguson, with several delegations of veterans. The Jeff Davis Volunteers also arrived from Fayette and met a hearty welcome. To-day two trains from Jackson and Meridian brought large accessions to the gathering, which was additionally recruited by large arrivals by steamers from Natchez, Greenville and points along the river. The day having been declared a holiday, the entire population of the city was out to receive the visitors, and the streets were thronged. Ex-Governor Lowry, State Tre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The gold and silver in the Confederate States Treasury. (search)
eam up, intending to run to Newberry. Just at daybreak, as we were ready to start, we saw some horsemen descending the hills, and upon sending out scouts learned that they were the advance guard of President Davis. About 10 A. M., May 2, 1865, President Davis and his Cabinet (save Messrs. Trenholm and Davis) rode in. They were escorted by four skeleton brigades of cavalry—not more than one thousand badly—armed men in all. These brigades were, I think, Duke's, Dibrell's, Vaughan's, and Ferguson's. The train was a long one. There were many brigadier-generals present—General Bragg among them—and wagons innumerable. Turned over to General Duke. I had several interviews with President Davis and found him calm and composed, and resolute to a degree. As soon as I saw Mr. Mallory he directed me to deliver the treasure to General Basil Duke, and disband my command. I went to the depot, and there, in the presence of my command, transferred it accordingly. General Duke was on hor