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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 28 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 20 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Ferrero or search for Ferrero in all documents.

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to the enemy. One piece of artillery, which had become mired and could not be hauled out by the horses, fell into their hands. The rear was brought up by General Ferrero's division of the Ninth corps, and as the progress of the wagon-trains in the advance was necessarily slow, no easy duty devolved upon that portion of our col side of the road for a distance of over two miles. Our guns were in position some time before noon, but it was near that hour when the fight became warm. General Ferrero, in falling back on the Loudon road, came in advance of Colonel Hartrauft, and defiling to the right, (it would be to the left as he marched, but facing the esition in line of battle. Colonel Hartrauft, whose flank was now reenforced by a detachment of General White's command, under Colonel Chapin, came in rear of General Ferrero as he passed the fork of the road, and, marching to the left, came into position on the southern slope of the valley, Colonel Chapin still holding his positio
were observed busily plying to and fro on the Lenoir road. Wounded men were seen walking and riding in, their numbers increasing hourly. At eleven o'clock, General Ferrero, in command of the earthworks at Rebel Point, opened his cannon upon Armstrong's house, behind which the enemy were discovered planting a battery. The enemy nce of Fort Sanders. Benjamin, of the Third United States artillery, and Buckley, of the First Rhode battery, were foremost in acts of daring and gallantry. General Ferrero, who has never left the fort since Longstreet's appearance before it, to whose skill and foresight much of the admirable dispositions for defence were due, wat; and at five o'clock next morning, (the twenty-ninth,) I sent out, as usual, the detail to relieve the reserve, with the instructions, which I received from General Ferrero, that the position lost on the previous night was to be retaken at all hazards. This was accomplished; but no sooner so, than the enemy again made a demonstr