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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 28 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 20 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 5 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Ferrero or search for Ferrero in all documents.

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yetteville. (In speaking of ½we½ and ½our,½ I refer to the movements of the ninth army corns, under Gen. Wilcox, to which I am, pro tem, attached.) An attack of the enemy upon the baggage train of the 1st and 2d brigades, (Gens. Negles and Ferrero.) of Sturgis's division, yesterday forenoon, which resulted in the death of Lieut Howard McIlvain, of Durell's battery, and which came very near resulting in the destruction or capture of a portion of the train, has been already partially descri for the time, which I had the ½melancholy pleasure½ of shooting for the same purpose. With these exceptions the entire train was got off in safety, having been extricated from an exceedingly unpleasant predicament. The second brigade, General Ferrero, being nearest the train, had meanwhile been ordered back to its protection. General Getty, of the third division, followed closely by General Burns, of the first, arrived on the ground about half past 9 o'clock, and by 10 o'clock Benjamin'<