Browsing named entities in Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz). You can also browse the collection for Edward Ferrero or search for Edward Ferrero in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
were throwing solid shot and shell at the rebels, and they were throwing solid shot and shells at us. . . . There was heavy skirmishing, with some artillery, all that morning, until we determined that the enemy had swung back both wings; and shortened and straightened his line. There lay both armies, each behind its breastworks, panting and exhausted, and scowling at each other. At five this morning a novel sight was presented to the Potomac Army. A division of black troops, under General Ferrero, and belonging to the 9th Corps, marched up and massed in a hollow near by. As I looked at them, my soul was troubled and I would gladly have seen them marched back to Washington. Can we not fight our own battles, without calling on these humble hewers of wood and drawers of water, to be bayonetted by the unsparing Southerners? We do not dare trust them in the line of battle. Ah, you may make speeches at home, but here, where it is life or death, we dare not risk it. They have been p
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), IV. Cold Harbor (search)
Nothing very new to-day. I took advantage of the propinquity of the nigger division (which had come to fill part of the 6th Corps' line, during its absence) to show the unbleached brethren to my Imperial commissioners. We rode first to General Ferrero's Headquarters. This officer, as his name hints, is an Italian by birth, his papa being of Milan. He is quite a well-looking man, and, like unto General Carr, was a dancing-master before he took to soldiering. He speaks Italian and some Fa great rate. This was an unaccustomed noise, for Burnside is commonly not musical, and I was speculating on the subject when, on entering the circle of tents, I beheld a collection of Generals — not only Burnside, but also Potter, Willcox, and Ferrero. Speaking of this last, did you hear what the negro straggler remarked, when arrested by the Provost-Guard near City Point, on the day of the assault, and asked what he was doing there. Well, saar, I will displain myself. You see, fus' I was
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
ly, which is a hard task for them. As we rode along the corduroy we met sixteen deserters from the enemy, coming in under guard, of whom about a dozen had their muskets, a sight I never saw before! They bring them in, all loaded, and we pay them so much for each weapon. The new line is a very handsome one, with a tremendous sweep of artillery and small arms. To eke out this short letter I enclose the report of the Court of Enquiry on the Mine. You see it gives fits to Burnside, Ledlie, Ferrero, and Willcox, while the last paragraph, though very obscure, is intended, I fancy, as a small snub on General Meade. March 5, 1865 . . . Well, the rain held up and some blue sky began to show, and I mounted on what I shall have to call my Anne of Cleves — for, in the choice words of that first of gentlemen, Henry VIII, she is a great Flanders mare --and rode forth for a little exercise. Verily I conceived we should rester en route, sich was the mud in one or two places! She would keep
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
339. Dutch Gap canal, 213, 233, 282. Earle, William, lieutenant-colonel, 49. Early, Jubal Anderson, 182, 185n, 190, 210, 216, 294, 320. Early, —, 36. Earthworks, use of, 99, 143, 240. Eaton, Amos Beebe, 248. Egan, Thomas Washington, 252. Ely's Ford, 86. Epps's house, 183. Eustis, Henry Lawrence, 33, 89, 91. Ewell, Richard Stoddert, 90, 93, 184; retreats, 45; suggests Lee's surrender, 354. falls,----, 212, 214. Farquhar, Francis Ulric, 138. Fay, Harry C., 213. Ferrero, Edward, 102, 310; described, 180; anecdote, 212. Fessenden, Francis, 248. Fessenden, William Pitt, 249, 259. Field, Charles W., 360. Fitzhugh, Norman R., 286. Flag of truce, 149, 170. Flint, Edward A., 278, 311. Forbes's naked-eyed Medusa, 226. Forsyth, James William, 357. Fort Fisher, 316. Fort Harrison, 281. Fort Stedman, 323. Fort Wadsworth, 249. Freikle, —, 287. French, William Henry, 26, 52, 53, 60, 80; described, 10; at Kelly's Ford, 43; failure to connect, 54; rage o