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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 11, 1865., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 10: (search)
about, which reflected great credit upon the generosity of some of our patriotic and worthy citizens. The house occupied by General Grant on I Street had been given him by some friends when he was General of the Army. He was about to move into the executive mansion, many thought for a residence of eight years at least. His successor as General of the Army was the next most renowned soldier of the Union army, General W. T. Sherman. A committee composed of A. T. Stewart, Hamilton Fish, B. F. Field, W. H. Aspinwall, Judge Hilton, Solon Humphrey, and William Scott had been chosen by the subscribers to present this house and the furniture to General Sherman. They had negotiated with General Grant, and had arranged that Mr. Hoyt and General Butterfield should take General Sherman to General Grant's office at an appointed hour. When they all met, the committee handed General Grant sixty-five thousand dollars. He, in exchange, gave them the deeds, bills of sale, and documents, making a
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 12: (search)
many years, making visits to Japan and returning. General Logan and I were dining at their home one night, when Associate Justice Field sat on Madame Yoshida's right and I sat next to Justice Field. The Justice was a very agreeable conversationaliJustice Field. The Justice was a very agreeable conversationalist and Madame Yoshida had learned to speak English quite well. Justice Field said: Madame Yoshida, how many children have you? She replied: I have two American and one Japanese children, at which Justice Field smiled. Quickly realizing the fact tJustice Field said: Madame Yoshida, how many children have you? She replied: I have two American and one Japanese children, at which Justice Field smiled. Quickly realizing the fact that she had made a mistake, she said: Two born in America, and one in Japan. One is named Ulysses Grant, and one other Roscoe Conkling. They were hospitable entertainers, and when you went there to a dinner they had many favors at your plate, whicJustice Field smiled. Quickly realizing the fact that she had made a mistake, she said: Two born in America, and one in Japan. One is named Ulysses Grant, and one other Roscoe Conkling. They were hospitable entertainers, and when you went there to a dinner they had many favors at your plate, which was then the custom. I said to Madame Yoshida at one time: It will be necessary to have an express to take the beautiful things you have given us to our home. She laughed heartily over it and said she would send them to the house by her servant