hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 36 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 36 4 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Charles W. Field or search for Charles W. Field in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
men (instead of 5008) in his three brigades, which does not exceed the ordinary strength of brigades then (that is to say, three average brigades would have had not less than 7000 men); and what Mr. Davis calls two brigades of 4000 effective were, in fact, Anderson's division sent to observe McDowell's corps at Fredericksburg, and so large that General Lee called it the army of the North, and estimated it as 10,000 men; I advised you, April 23d, of certain troops ordered to report to General Field, viz.: two regiments from Richmond, two light batteries, a brigade from South Carolina, and one from North Carolina (Anderson's), in all 8000, in addition to those [2500.--J. E. J.] previously there.--General Lee's letter, May 8th.--Official Records, Vol. XI., Part III., pp 500-1.--J. E. J. and the second, Branch's brigade, greatly strengthened to protect the railroad at Gordonsville, and estimated by General Lee as 5000 men. Two brigades, one from North Carolina (Branch's) and one
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iv.--origin of the Lee tomatoes. (search)
Iv.--origin of the Lee tomatoes.by W. Roy Mason, Major, C. S. A. one day in June, 1862, General Lee rode over to General Charles W. Field's headquarters at Meadow Bridge and asked for me. I would say here that on leaving home to enter the Army I carried a family letter of introduction to General Lee; and on account of that, and also my relationship to Colonel Charles Marshall, an aide on his staff, my visits at army headquarters were exceptionally pleasant. When General Lee approached me on this occasion, he said: Captain, can General Field spare you a little while? I replied, Certainly, General; what can I do for you? I have some property, he answered, in the hands of the enemy, and General McClellan has informed me that he would deliver it to me at any time I asked for it. Then, putting aside his jesting manner, he told me that his wife and Miss Mary Lee, his daughter, had been caught within the Federal lines at the White House, the residence of General W. H. F. Lee, his so
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
s G. Hodges; 38th Va., Col. E. C. Edmonds; 53d Va., Capt. William R. Aylett, Maj. George M. Waddill, Capt. R. W. Martin, Col. H. B. Tomlin; 57th Va., Lieut.-Col. Waddy T. James; 5th Va. Battalion, Capt. William E. Alley; Va. Battery (Fauquier Arty.), Capt. Robert M. Stribling; Va. Battery, Capt. William H. Turner. Brigade loss: k, 51; w, 281; m, 69 ==401. Hill's (light) division (attached to Longstreet's command June 29th-July 1st), Maj.-Gen. Ambrose P. Hill. First Brigade, Brig.--Gen. Charles W. Field: 40th Va., Col. J. M. Brockenbrough; 47th Va., Col. Robert M. Mayo; 55th Va., Col. Francis Mallory; 60th Va., Col. William E. Starke (w), Lieut.-Col. B. H. Jones, Col. William E. Starke, Maj. J. C. Summers. Brigade loss: k, 78; w, 500; m, 2 == 580. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Maxcy Gregg: 1st S. C., Col. D. H. Hamilton; 1st S. C. (Rifles), Col. J. Foster Marshall; 12th S. C., Col. Dixon Barnes (w); 13th S. C., Col. 0. E. Edwards; 14th S. C., Col. Samuel McGowan. Brigade loss: k,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
) was attached to the division of D. H. Hill and came up as a reinforcement to Pender, who, with Field, Archer, and Anderson, were part of the division of A. P. Hill, his other two divisions, Gregg a1, but little more than that of the 44th Georgia alone (335). The Confederate loss, exclusive of Field's and Anderson's brigades and of the batteries, is reported at 1589. General Longstreet is quote H, J, L, Y, line of A. P. Hill's six brigades at the opening of the battle, as follows: Archer, Field, Anderson (J. R.), Branch, Gregg, Pender; I, K, Hood and Law (Whiting's division of Jackson's corps), replacing Archer, Field, Anderson; M, N, 0, P, Jackson's old division, as follows: Fulkerson (3d Va.), Cunningham (2d Va.), Lawton, and Winder; Q, R, S, Seymour, Trimble, and Elzey; T, U, V, W,he Editors, says: Whiting's division covered the ground on which J. R. Anderson's, Archer's, and Field's brigades had previously attacked. We passed over some of these men as we advanced to the assa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
ginia regiments) advanced out of formation, in wedge shape, and with trailing arms, and began a hand-to-hand conflict over the guns, which were finally yielded to them [see p. 413]. service together in the 4th infantry, I moved to offer my hand as he dismounted. At the first motion, however, I saw he did not regard the occasion as one for renewing the old friendship, and I merely offered him some of my staff as an escort to Richmond. Major W. Roy Mason, who served on the staff of General C. W. Field, C. S. A., gives this account of the capture of General McCall at Glendale, on the evening of June 30th: we occupied as headquarters [at the close of the battle] the center of an old road that ran through a dense pine-wood which the enemy had occupied only two hours before, and the dead and wounded were lying about us. General field asked me to remain with the other members of the staff, and volunteered to go down to a water-course, where he had seen water trickling, to fill the c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., With the cavalry on the Peninsula. (search)
ode, into the face of Longstreet's corps, and the 5th Cavalry was destroyed and dispersed. Six out of the seven officers present and fifty men were struck down. Chambliss, hit by seven balls, lost consciousness, and when he recovered found himself in the midst of the enemy. The charge at Balaklava had not this desperation and was not better ridden. Chambliss lay on the field ten days, and was finally taken to Richmond, where he was rescued from death by the kind care of Generals Hood and Field. In this battle there were two and a half squadrons of the 5th and two squadrons of the 1st U. S. Cavalry, three squadrons Rush's Lancers (6th Pennsylvania Cavalry), and-one squadron 4th Pennsylvania (Col. Childs). Two or three weeks before this several officers of the 3d Pennsylvania Cavalry, Newhall, Treichel, W. E. Miller, and others, penetrated the region between the Chickahominy and the James, taking bearings and making notes. Their fragmentary sketches, when put together, made a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
to their first line. One piece of artillery, several stands of colors, and a number of prisoners were captured. Our loss was severe in this engagement; Brigadier-Generals Field and Trimble, and Colonel Forno, commanding Hays's brigade, were severely wounded, and several other valuable officers killed or disabled whose names are on, I occupied the line of the unfinished railroad, my extreme left resting near Sudley Ford, my right near the point where the road strikes the open field, Gregg, Field, and Thomas in the front line; Gregg on the left and Field on the right;; with Branch, Pender, and Archer as supports. . . . The evident intention of the enemyField on the right;; with Branch, Pender, and Archer as supports. . . . The evident intention of the enemy this day was to turn our left and overwhelm Jackson's corps before Longstreet came up, and to accomplish this the most persistent and furious onsets were made, by column after column of infantry, accompanied by numerous batteries of artillery. Soon my reserves were all in, and up to 6 o'clock my division, assisted by the Louisian
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Cedar Mountain, Va.: August 9th, 1862. (search)
ter Turney: 7th Tenn.,-----; 14th Tenn., Col. W. A. Forbes. Brigade loss: k, 19; w, 116=135. Thomas's Brigade, Col. Edward L. Thomas: 14th Ga., Col. R. W. Folsom; 35th Ga.,-----; 45th Ga.,-----; 49th Ga.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 24; w, 133 = 157. Field's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles W. Field: 22d Va. Battalion,-----; 40th Va.,-----; 55th Va.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 6 = 13. Fender's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William D. Pender: 16th N. C.,-----; 22d N. C., Lieut.-Col. Robert H. Gray; 34th N. C., CBrig.-Gen. Charles W. Field: 22d Va. Battalion,-----; 40th Va.,-----; 55th Va.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 6 = 13. Fender's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William D. Pender: 16th N. C.,-----; 22d N. C., Lieut.-Col. Robert H. Gray; 34th N. C., Col. Richard H. Riddick; 38th N. C., Capt. John Ashford. Brigade. loss: k, 2; w, 11; m, 2=15. Artillery, Lieut.-Col. R. L. Walker; Va. Battery (Purcell Art'y), Capt. W. J. Pegram; Va. Battery (Middlesex Art'y), Lieut. W. B. Hardy; Va. Battery (Fredericksburg Art'y), Capt. Carter M. Braxton; N. C. Battery (Branch Art'y), Capt. A. C. Latham. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 12 = 14. Third division, Maj.-Gen. Richard S. Ewell. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early: 12th Ga., Capt. William F. Brow
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
as Bush (k), Lieut. Charles M. Hooper; 19th Ga., Capt. F. M. Johnston; 1st Tenn. (Provisional Army), Col. Peter Turney; 7th Tenn., Maj. S. G. Shepard; 14th Tenn., Col. W. A. Forbes (m w), Maj. James W. Lockert. Brigade loss: k, 21; w, 213 = 234. Field's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles W. Field (w), Col. J. M. Brockenbrough: 40th Va., Col. J. M. Brockenbrough; 47th Va. [Col. Robert M. Mayo (w)]; 55th Va. [Col. Frank Mallory]; 22d Va. Battalion,-----. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 80 = 95. Third divisiBrig.-Gen. Charles W. Field (w), Col. J. M. Brockenbrough: 40th Va., Col. J. M. Brockenbrough; 47th Va. [Col. Robert M. Mayo (w)]; 55th Va. [Col. Frank Mallory]; 22d Va. Battalion,-----. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 80 = 95. Third division, Maj.-Gen. Richard S. Ewell (w), Brig.-Gen. A. R. Lawton. Staff loss: w, 1. Lawton's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. A. R. Lawton, Col. M. Douglass: 13th Ga., Col. M. Douglass; 26th Ga.,-----; 31st Ga.,-----; 38th Ga.,-----; 60th Ga., Maj. T. J. Berry; 61st Ga.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 139; w, 368; m, 5=512. Trimble's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Isaac R. Trimble (w), Capt. W. F. Brown (k): 15th Ala., Maj. A. A. Lowther; 12th Ga., Capt. W. F. Brown; 21st Ga., Capt. Thomas C. Glover; 21st N. C., Lieut.-Col. Sa
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
f sharp but distant explosions coming to our ears, foretold the passage of Thoroughfare Gap; and the next day, before noon, Longstreet's advance, under Hood, mingled their hurrahs with those of our men. Jackson's force in this raid consisted of three divisions, as follows: Ewell's division, composed of the brigades of Lawton, Early, Hayes (Forno commanding), and Trimble, with the batteries of Brown, Dement, Latimer, Balthus, and D'Acquin; Hill's division, of the brigades of Branch, Gregg, Field, Pender, Archer, and Thomas, with the batteries of Braxton, Latham, Crenshaw, McIntosh, Davidson, and Pegram; and Jackson's old division consisted of the brigades of Starke, Taliaferro (Col. A. G. Taliaferro commanding), Winder (Col. Baylor commanding), and Campbell (Major John Seddon commanding), with the batteries of Brocken-borough, Poague, Wooding, Carpenter, Caskie, and Raine. After the 26th, Colonel Bradley T. Johnson commanded Campbell's brigade. General Stuart, with the brigades of
1 2