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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 36 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 36 4 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 19 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Charles W. Field or search for Charles W. Field in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
various losses be added the heavy losses of June 3d at Cold Harbor, the, entire loss will not fall much, if at all, under one hundred thousand men. Page 139. Recapitulating various successes in the vicinity of Petersburg: The very successful attack on Hancock at Reams' station by Heth's division and a portion of Wilcox's on the 25th of August, under the direction of General A. P. Hill. The force engaged was McGowan's, Lane's and Scales' brigades of my division,. and Anderson's brigade of Field's division, attached to my command, two batteries of Pegram's battalion of artillery, and the brigades of Generals Cooke and McLean of Heth's division. These were the only infantry engaged. The cavalry under Hampton were present, and did good service, capturing many of the prisoners. My report of this battle was published over two years ago by the Southern Historical Society. On page 164 is a return of the army then commanded by General Johnston, endorsed Army near Richmond, Department
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of the Wilderness. (search)
r-General to report with the original portion of the First corps (Kershaw's and Field's divisions and Alexander's battalion of artillery) to General R. E. Lee, comma to Mechanicsville, and encamped in the near neighborhood thereof. On the 2d Field's division was moved to the north of Gordonsville, to meet an expected advance let the retreating divisions through, Kershaw formed his line on the right and Field on the left of the Plank road. Having checked the advance of the enemy, I ordeneral of my being obliged to quit the field, and the command devolved on Major-General Field. To the members of my staff I am under great obligations for their va field works some half mile or more in advance. The lines being rectified, and Field's division and Wofford's brigade of my own having arrived, upon the suggestion e of the Orange railroad on our right, with the brigades of General Anderson of Field's division and Brigadier-General Wofford's of my own, supported by Mahone's bri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General C. M. Wilcox on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ry should have justified his attack of the enemy. No one ever heard it claimed that General Lee because his cavalry was absent attacked the enemy at Gettysburg. And in his supplementary article: All night long of the 1st (April) we marched with Field's division from Richmond to Petersburg, reaching that point at early dawn on the 2d. I at once went to General Lee's headquarters and found him in bed in his tent. While I was sitting upon the side of his couch, discussing my line of march and olonel Venable brought with him General Harris' brigade of Mahone's division. The enemy were delayed an hour or more, and when the troops were finally withdrawn to the Petersburg line of defences, General Longstreet's troops began to arrive, and Field's division, or the most of it, came up and was placed in the interval between the right of our lines and the Appomattox. There could have been no occasion for Generals Lee and Longstreet discussing any move involving Five Forks, as the battle at