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The Daily Dispatch: June 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Fielder or search for Fielder in all documents.

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The general at this instant rode in front of the lines, and, seizing the flag from the hands of the color-bearer, gallantly led them to the charge. In this charge he was assisted by Colonel S. S. Heard. Colonel Looney, Thirty-eighth Tennessee, says of Captain John C. Carter: At one time he took the flag, and, urging his men forward, rendered me great assistance in moving forward the entire regiment. Major Caldwell, of the Twelfth Tennessee, says in his report: Private Fielder took charge of Companies B and G, which were left without a commissioned officer. He led these two companies all day in the thickest part of the battle. Colonel Mouton, of the Eighteenth Louisiana, says in his report: From 8 A. M. until half-past 1 P. M. we were constantly marching and countermarching — the Orleans Guards, in the mean time, having been attached to my command. About 2 P. M. we were ordered to move on the enemy — which was done without energy or life by the tr