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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William Fielding or search for William Fielding in all documents.

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eorge Hart. Company E.--Wounded--Sergeant Watson A. Mallory, in foot. Privates John O'Brien, in leg; Anthony Welder, in thigh; James Willis, in knee — all prisoners. Missing--Privates Samuel Hart, John Kelsey, Edward L. Marsh-supposed to be prisoners. Company F.--Killed--Privates James Flynn, James Nelson, Michael Dowling, Henry Hilliard, Wm. Mackay. Wounded--Capt. Hugh McQuaide, severely, taken prisoner. Privates John McIntire, Patrick McGann, Martin O'Neill, Thomas Murphy, Wm. Fielding. Missing--Sergeant Donahoe, Corporal Moloney, Privates Timothy Sullivan, Michael Kennedy, Joseph Sheppard, Patrick Coyle, Lawrence Mooney, John Holland. Company G.--Wounded--First Lieut. Thomas S. Hamblin, in the leg. Privates Edward Sweeney, Benjamin Taylor, (all taken prisoners,) Henry Lansing. Missing--Henry Hedge, Thomas H. Kerr, Patrick McGinn, William H. Millett, Charles J. Rydecker, George Wright, (all supposed to have been taken prisoners.) Company H.--Killed--Private Jo
rles Edward, flashed with success, his little force now swelled to seven thousand, invaded England, besieged and reduced Carlisle, baffled Field Marshal Wade, and reached Derby on his way to London? It certainly appears to me, says Lord Stanhope in his interesting monograph on the Forty-five, that the prince and his soldiers were right in their reluctance to retreat, and that, had they pursued their progress, they would, in all probability, have succeeded in their object. A loyal writer, (Fielding, the great novelist,) who was in London at the time, declares that when the Highlanders, by a most incredible march, got between the Duke of Cumberland's army and the metropolis, they struck a terror into it, scarcely to be credited. An immediate rush was made upon the Bank of England, which,, it is said, only escaped bankruptcy by paying in sixpences, to gain time. The shops were shut, public business for the most part suspended, and the restoration of the Stuarts, desired by some, but d