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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 3, 1860., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Findley or search for Findley in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.43 (search)
re of our own guns in front of a Federal battery, which was shelled from Fort Sumter. The first evening and night the shelling was very heavy but none of us were killed. It seemed our guns got the range and fired over us. One morning while Captain Findley, of Virginia (now a preacher in Augusta county), J. E. Cobb, H. Coffry and myself were in our small tent just after Captain Findley had read a chapter in a Bible, which I now have and in which I placed all the notes of all my travels, a largCaptain Findley had read a chapter in a Bible, which I now have and in which I placed all the notes of all my travels, a large shell fell right at our feet and covered us all with sand, but fortunately did not explode nor break up our accustomed worship. We were guarded by negro troops commanded by Colonel Hallowell, who was a heartless man, and under him the most cruel treatment was experienced. We were not allowed any privileges, and often fired into by the guards for the most trivial offence and several men were wounded. There was a plan on foot to tunnel out and make our escape, but the equinoctial storm f