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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Joseph Finks or search for Joseph Finks in all documents.

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h whom I was encamped, to form his command instantly into line, which was promptly executed; and hearing cannonading at this time, I determined to move forward with this regiment of infantry to the position designated by your orders, leaving Capt. Jos. Finks, one of my assistant aids, with directions to order Col. Major, when he came up, to follow with his command. When I had moved forward about three hundred yards from my encampment, I discovered the enemy strongly posted in our front, upon from their companies, rushed through his line, dividing his forces, and leaving the colonel with but one company. I am glad, however, to be able to state that the gallant colonel, aided by Col. C. W. Bell, assistant adjutant-general, and Captain Joseph Finks, one of my assistant aids, succeeded in gathering up some 300 mounted men, who, under his command, attacked the forces in our rear, commanded by Gen. Siegel, capturing 157 prisoners, and killing 64 men; the balance of his forces, under the
h whom I was encamped, to form his command instantly into line, which was promptly executed; and hearing cannonading at this time, I determined to move forward with this regiment of infantry to the position designated by your orders, leaving Capt. Jos. Finks, one of my assistant aids, with directions to order Col. Major, when he came up, to follow with his command. When I had moved forward about three hundred yards from my encampment, I discovered the enemy strongly posted in our front, upon from their companies, rushed through his line, dividing his forces, and leaving the colonel with but one company. I am glad, however, to be able to state that the gallant colonel, aided by Col. C. W. Bell, assistant adjutant-general, and Captain Joseph Finks, one of my assistant aids, succeeded in gathering up some 300 mounted men, who, under his command, attacked the forces in our rear, commanded by Gen. Siegel, capturing 157 prisoners, and killing 64 men; the balance of his forces, under the