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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 19 1 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 10 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 4, 1864., [Electronic resource] 8 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 4 0 Browse Search
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Thomas C. DeLeon, Four years in Rebel capitals: an inside view of life in the southern confederacy, from birth to death., Chapter 21: the conscription and its consequences. (search)
f New England. But like all dunghill products, the life of these was ephemeral. Its root struck no deeper than the refuse the war had left; and during its continuance the genus was so little known that a Carlyle, or a Brownlow, was looked upon with the same curiosity and disgust as a very rare, but a very filthy, exotic. With the exceptions of portions of Kentucky and Tennessee, no parts of the South were untrue to the government they had accepted. Florida was called loyal and General Finnegan proved with what truth. Loyal Missouri has written her record in the blood of Price's ragged heroes. Louisiana, crushed by the iron heel of military power, spoiled of her household gods and insulted in her women's name, still bowed not her proud head to the flag that had thus become hostile. And the Valley of Virginia! Ploughed by the tramp of invading squadrons-her fair fields laid waste and the sanctity of her every household invaded-alternately the battle-ground of friend and
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 4: up the St. John's. (search)
n of pickets was varied each night to perplex the enemy, and some advantage taken of his distrust, which might be assumed as equalling our own. The citizens were duly impressed by our supply of ammunition, which was really enormous, and all these things soon took effect. A loyal woman, who came into town, said that the Rebel scouts, stopping at her house, reported that there were sixteen hundred negroes all over the woods, and the town full of them besides. It was of no use to go in. General Finnegan had driven them into a bad place once, and should not do it again. They had lost their captain and their best surgeon in the first skirmish, and if the Savannah people wanted the negroes driven away, they might come and do it themselves. Unfortunately, we knew that they could easily come from Savannah at any time, as there was railroad communication nearly all the way; and every time we heard the steam-whistle, the men were convinced of their arrival. Thus we never could approach to
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
J. B., Lt., 170. Corwin, B. R., Maj., 115, 122. Crandall, W. B., Surg., 269. Crum, Simon, Corp., 266. Cushman, James, 256. Danilson, W. H., Maj., 80, 270. Davis, C. I, Lt., 271. Davis,.R. M., Lt., 272. Davis, W. W. H., Gen., 168. Dewhurst, G. W., Adj't., 270. Dewhurst, Mrs., 242. Dolly, George, Capt., 179, 270. Doolittle, J. R., Hon., 285. Duncan, Lt. Comr., 160, 103. Dupont, S. F., Admiral, 67,78, 89,100, 135. Dutch, Capt., 170. Fessenden, W. P., Hon., 285, 287. Finnegan, Gen., 108. Fisher, J., Lt., 271. Fowler, J. H., Chap.,40, 113, 231, 270. Fremont, J. C., Gen., 23, 42. French, J., Rev., 40, 118. Furman, J. T., Lt., 272. Gage, F. D., Mrs., 41. Garrison, W. L., 249. Gaston, William, Lt., 271. Gillmore, Q. A., Gen., 167, 168, 183, 235,237, 240. Goldsborough, Commodore, 243, 274. Goodell, J. B., Lt., 2. Goodrich, F. S., Lt., 271, 272. Gould, E., Corp., 274. Gould, F. M., Lt., 272. Greene, Sergt., 121. Hallett, Capt., 65, 66, 274. Hallowell,
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, XXXV. February, 1864 (search)
$8.00 per pound; rice, 85 cents, etc. There is a rumor that Gen. Finnegan has captured the enemy in Florida. Gen. Lee says his army iet the enemy at last, and gained a brilliant success-and so has Gen. Finnegan. But the correspondence between the President and Gen. Johnstopatch. Charleston, February 11th, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper. Gen Finnegan has repulsed the enemy's force at Lake Citydetails not known. patch. Charleston, February 11th-11 A. M. To Gen. S. Cooper. Gen. Finnegan's success yesterday was very creditable-the enemy's force beingof the escaped Federal officers. Nothing more from Gens. Wise and Finnegan. The enemy have retreated again on the Peninsula. It is said Meay will never get back. And a dispatch from Beauregard confirms Finnegan's victory in Florida. He captured all the enemy's artillery, storry 23d-2.15 P. M. To Gen. S. Cooper. The latest reports from Gen. Finnegan give no particulars of the victory at Occum Pond, except that h
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 22: from Cold Harbor to evacuation of Richmond and Petersburg (search)
we could not repress a vague feeling that, somehow, we were not doing our full duty. Especially was this feeling intensified when, a few months later, Mahone's division, which had been manning a very trying part of the Petersburg lines, was brought over between the Appomattox and the James to relieve Pickett's, which was sent north of the James. We thought we had before seen men with the marks of hard service upon them; but the appearance of this division of Mahone's, and particularly of Finnegan's Florida brigade, with which we happened to be most closely associated, made us realize, for the first time, what our comrades in the hottest Petersburg lines were undergoing. We were shocked at the condition, the complexion, the expression of the men, and of the officers, too, even the field officers; indeed we could scarcely realize that the unwashed, uncombed, unfed and almost unclad creatures we saw were officers oi rank and reputation in the Army It was a great pleasure, too, to note
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 49: Fort Pillow, Ocean Pond, and Meridian. (search)
6 negroes, 163 whites) unwounded, which, with the wounded, make an aggregate of those who survived, exclusive of all who may have escaped, quite 300 souls, or fully fifty-five per cent. of all the garrison, while those who survived unhurt constituted forty per cent. Campaign of Lieutenant-General N. B. Forrest. This was the so-called massacre of Fort Pillow. The year 1864 opened auspiciously for the Confederates, and their hopes rose high after each victory. On February 20th Generals Finnegan and Colquitt, near Ocean Pond, Fla., with 5,000 men, achieved a victory over General Seymour's 7,000 troops that had just arrived from Charleston Harbor. This battle expelled the enemy from Florida. On February 3d General Sherman, with 30,000 men, without opposition crossed the State of Mississippi to Meridian. The Federal cavalry started from Corinth and Holly Springs, and laid waste that fertile district on their way to join Sherman. Our great cavalry, leader, General Forrest,
in the army. Always in the front, he lost a limb at Chickamauga; John C. Breckinridge, Charley Field, S. B. Buckner, Morgan, Duke, and Preston; the latter with his fine brigades under Gracie, Trigg, and Kelly, gave the enemy the coup de grdce which terminated the battle of Chickamauga. Missouri gave us Bowen, and Green, and Price, that grand old man, worshipped and followed to the death by his brave patriotic Missourians. From Arkansas came the gallant Cleburne, McNair, McRea, and Finnegan, the hero of Olustee, Fla., and Ben McCullough, the old Indian fighter who yielded his life on the battle-field of Elkhorn. From Maryland came brave Commander Buchanan, Generals Trimble, Elzey, Charles Winder, who laid down his life upon the field, and George Stewart, Bradley Johnson, who proved himself a very Bayard in feats of arms, and our Colonel of the Signal Corps, William Norris, who, by systematizing the signals which he displayed under the most furious fire, rendered inestimabl
offer of amnesty Gillmore and Seymour in Florida Finnegan defeats Seymour at Olustee Rebel salt-works in Fl leading: the intent being to surprise the Rebel Gen. Finnegan at Camp Finnegan, 8 miles west. The advance was bravely made; but only 150 men were at the camp — Finnegan, with the residue, having hurriedly fallen back. st to Tallahassee; but here, at 11 A. M., he found Finnegan in position, very stubborn, and too strong to be mfantry, for orders and food. It was reported that Finnegan, though he had 3,000 men, fell back from Lake Cityevent the dispatch of Rebel forces from Georgia to Finnegan! Gillmore at once wrote him a strong remonstran of his column ran square into the dead-fall which Finnegan had set for him. Our men were faint with hunger anroad, in order to avoid and flank the swamp. Here Finnegan had disposed his men, under cover of the swamp andh lay in artillery, whereof we had 16 pieces to 4--Finnegan having lost most of his in his hasty retreat from
ed their return to our camps. But, by this time, the enemy were all around them, and intent on their destruction. Striking the Weldon road at Stony creek, June 28. they were again confronted by more Rebels than they could drive; and, after a hard fight, were obliged to give up the attempt, and make for Reams's station, which Wilson undoubtedly supposed to be now held by Hancock or Warren. He was badly mistaken, however; for here was a far stronger Rebel force (including Mahone's and Finnegan's infantry brigades, beside Hampton's cavalry) than that which had baffled him at Stony creek; and his attempt to force a passage resulted in his signal defeat, involving the loss of his guns, his train, with many prisoners and their horses. About 1,000 negroes, who had fallen into the wake of our cavalry — many of them mounted on horses borrowed for the occasion — here fell into the hands of the Rebels, and were returned to a servitude which their effort to escape was not calculated to li
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
Steuart's Johnson's 7 65 -- 72 4th Virginia Walker's Johnson's 7 48 4 59 Olustee, Fla.             Feb. 20, 1864.             32d Georgia Harrison's Finnegan's 15 149 -- 164 64th Georgia Harrison's Finnegan's 17 88 2 107 2d Florida Battalion Harrison's Finnegan's 12 95 2 109 There are no muster-out rolls oFinnegan's 17 88 2 107 2d Florida Battalion Harrison's Finnegan's 12 95 2 109 There are no muster-out rolls of the Confederate regiments. There are partial sets of muster-rolls and monthly returns at Washington in the Bureau of Confederate Archives; but they are defective and incomplete. There is no way of determining accurately the mortuary loss of each Confederate regiment during its entire service. The total losses of a few regimFinnegan's 12 95 2 109 There are no muster-out rolls of the Confederate regiments. There are partial sets of muster-rolls and monthly returns at Washington in the Bureau of Confederate Archives; but they are defective and incomplete. There is no way of determining accurately the mortuary loss of each Confederate regiment during its entire service. The total losses of a few regiments have been ascertained from other sources. The History of Gregg's South Carolina Brigade states the number of deaths in each regiment, and, judging from the casualty lists given for each action, the statistics are substantially correct.   Killed and Died of Wounds. Died of Disease. Gregg's Brigade. Officers. En.
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