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John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Stuart W. Fisk or search for Stuart W. Fisk in all documents.

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Quick as the report that follows a flash was heard New Orleans' response. On the 14th the news was received in the city. On the 15th the Crescent Rifles, Capt. S. W. Fisk, left for Pensacola, Fla., followed by the Louisiana Guards, Capt. S. M. Todd. On the 16th the Louisiana Guards, with the Shreveport Grays, the Grivot Grayss engaged at Young's Mills, Va. While an affair of no importance in itself, it was disastrous in the loss of one whom Louisiana had lately learned to value. Capt. S. W. Fisk, of the Crescent Rifles, in his report, addressed to Maj. N. M. Rightor, of the Louisiana battalion, thus speaks of the skirmish: Young's Mills, Va., I regret deeply to report the death of our gallant and able commander, Lieutenant-Colonel Dreux, and of Private Stephen Hackett, of the Shreveport Grays. * * * S. W. Fisk, Captain, commanding Crescent Rifles. Charles D. Dreux, so early killed in the war, was mourned in the city which knew him best as a loss both as a citizen
, Bragg suddenly withdrew from the field. Decidedly, a tactical check had been suffered by Bragg. Loss, about 5,000 men on either side. With Bragg in the wearisome march and the tug of battle was the Louisiana brigade of the army of Tennes-see, organized under the command of Daniel W. Adams, promoted to brigadier-general. It included the Thir-teenth regiment, Col. R. L. Gibson; Sixteenth, Col. D. C. Gober; Twentieth, Col. August Reichard, Lieut.-Col. Leon von Zinken; Twenty-fifth, Col. S. W. Fisk; Fourteenth battalion sharpshooters, Maj. J. E. Austin; and Fifth company, Washington artillery, Capt. C. H. Slocomb. Adams was put in line on the extreme left, and while a fierce attack was being made on the angle of the Federal line the Louisianians advanced with Buckner's left All along the line the enemy was driven back, throwing away arms and equipment, and Adams' bri-gade, with the others, followed for about a mile. The Washington artillery, whose guns had opened the ball, follo
le struggle was compelled to give way. The whole Federal army was packed in columns behind the position Adams was sent to attack in front. It was here that Col. Stuart W. Fisk, of the consolidated Sixteenth, was killed while bravely leading a desperate charge. Colonel Fisk had gone out in the Crescent Rifles—the first command to Colonel Fisk had gone out in the Crescent Rifles—the first command to leave the city, May 15, 1861—and had been on the Peninsula with Dreux‘ battalion. His death was a serious blow to our Louisiana contingent in Tennessee. He was a gallant officer, who in danger possessed that coolness which, while it attracts peril, minimizes it. Devoted to his men, he was by them fully trusted and deeply regretted. The loss was very heavy. Fisk's regiment had 457 men, and 217 were put hors de combat. Among the killed of the brigade were Lieuts. Charles J. Hepburn, R. O. Smith, H. Gregory, A. Ranlett, and T. L. McLean, and among the wounded General Adams and his adjutant, Capt. Emile P. Guillet, and Lieuts. J. M. Clayton, Louis Stagg,