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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
exas. He was greeted with cheers, and his carriage escorted by the military and the crowd to the Brunswick hotel. Here a reception speech was made by Senator W. H. Burgess (Private Burgess, of Hood's old Brigade), so touchingly eloquent that General Fitz. filled up, and could scarcely find words with which to reply; but his tears were more eloquent than words could have been. We were driven around this beautiful city, and shown all points of interest, escorted to the Capitol and introducedand had (as courier for his father, the gallant General R. L. T. Beale, who carried into the Ninth Virginia Cavalry his four sons, and made with them a proud record for gallantry and faithful discharge of duty) been frequently under the eye of General Fitz. in some of the most daring exploits of his troopers. Judge Beale had, the day before, shown his interest in the occasion, by saying to the bar and all others concerned: The court stands adjourned until day after to-morrow, gentlemen. Gen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
exas. He was greeted with cheers, and his carriage escorted by the military and the crowd to the Brunswick hotel. Here a reception speech was made by Senator W. H. Burgess (Private Burgess, of Hood's old Brigade), so touchingly eloquent that General Fitz. filled up, and could scarcely find words with which to reply; but his tears were more eloquent than words could have been. We were driven around this beautiful city, and shown all points of interest, escorted to the Capitol and introducedand had (as courier for his father, the gallant General R. L. T. Beale, who carried into the Ninth Virginia Cavalry his four sons, and made with them a proud record for gallantry and faithful discharge of duty) been frequently under the eye of General Fitz. in some of the most daring exploits of his troopers. Judge Beale had, the day before, shown his interest in the occasion, by saying to the bar and all others concerned: The court stands adjourned until day after to-morrow, gentlemen. Gen
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
ion of Missouri, at Jefferson City, August the 28th, and to repeat his lecture on Chancellorsville, for the benefit of the Southern Historical Society, at such points in Missouri as General Marmaduke may arrange for. Friends in Missouri, or Kentucky, or Arkansas, who desire to have General Lee's lecture, would do well to correspond at once with this office, or with General John S. Marmaduke, St. Louis, Mo. We are hoping for another successful tour with our gallant and accomplished friend, General Fitz. in our Acknowledgement of courtesies in our last number, we inadvertently omitted the name of J. F. Crosby, Vice-President and General Manager of the Texas and New Orleans and Louisiana Western Railways, whose cheerfully extended courtesy over his splendid Crescent Route was warmly appreciated. And we had purposed extending our very special thanks to our old friend Colonel J. G. James, President of the Texas Military College, who rendered invaluable aid in arranging the programme of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 54 (search)
ruly sad and distressing though to witness the frequent piles of wagons and mules that in many places blockaded the roads. In several places I saw as many as four wagons, with their teams, drivers and bales of hay, all piled together indiscriminately in a gully, with the poor mules stretched upon the ground beneath the wagons, struggling in vain against the heavy burden and strong harness that held them, sufferers, in their places. Returning to Rockville from the charge, we were joined by Fitz. Lee, who had been operating on a different road, and who brought with him many prisoners, among them a great many contrabands, some of whom were recognized and claimed. There were some known to me, among whom was one of Uncle Tom's, two of F. W. Cox's, one of J. W. Branson's, besides several free negroes. From Rockville we continued the march towards the Baltimore and Ohio railroad; traveled all night, and crossed the track, a part of which we destroyed next morning. This day we trave
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
the inner country, and renew the unequal strife? Not till that hope is tested will they yield! As the day dawns, a remnant of the cavalry under Fitz. Lee is forming, and Gordon's infantry, scarce two thousand strong, are touching elbows for the last charge. Once more the thrilling rebel cheer rings through the Virginia woods, and with all their wonted fierceness they fall upon Sheridan's men. Ah! yes, victory still clings to the tattered battle-flags. Yes, the troopers of our gallant Fitz. are as dauntless as when they followed the plume of Stuart, the flower of cavaliers. Yes, the matchless infantry of tattered uniforms and bright muskets under Gordon, the brave, move with as swift, intrepid tread as when of old—Stonewall led the way. Soldiers of Manassas, of Richmond, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, of the Wilderness, of Spotsylvania, of Cold Harbor, of Petersburg—scarred and sinewy veterans of fifty fields, your glories are still about you, your