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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
kes human nature shudder, incarcerated in damp cells without blankets, some with no coats, Mr. Moses adds that nothing but the preserving hand of God kept us through those trying hours. How much greater was the crime of a Christian people, that the ministry in the peaceful regions were inflaming this horrible work, instead of alleviating the sufferings of the people. Added to all of the other atrocious crimes and cruelties, the insane were in like manner tortured. An old gentleman named Fitzgerald, infirm and insane, who ate opium to alleviate his pain, was denied his medicine for which he begged, until death kindly came to open the prison doors and release him from his agony. The prisoners say that Foster instigated these cruelties. The names and references of the parties clothe the whole statement with an unmistakable semblance of truth. The corroboration is conclusive. John L. Waring, of Brandywine, Prince George's county, Maryland, states that he was a prisoner of war for
th obstinacy also, but the coveted crossroads fell to Merritt without much trouble, as the bulk of the enemy was just then bent on other things. At the same hour that Merritt started, Crook moved Smith's brigade out northwest from Dinwiddie to Fitzgerald's crossing of Chamberlain's Creek, to cover Merritt's left, supporting Smith by placing Gregg to his right and rear. The occupation of this ford was timely, for Pickett, now in command of both the cavalry and infantry, was already marching toimportance, and I determined to stay there at all hazards. At the same time orders were sent to Smith's brigade, which, by the advance of Pickett past its right flank and the pressure of W. H. F. Lee on its front, had been compelled to give up Fitzgerald's crossing, to fall back toward Dinwiddie but to contest every inch of ground so as to gain time. When halted by the attack of Gregg and Gibbs, Pickett, desisting from his pursuit of Devin, as already stated, turned his undivided attention
to administer such laws, etc., etc. This passed the Senate by 29 Yeas Including only Messrs. Dickinson of New York, A. C. Dodge of Iowa, Douglas of Illinois, Fitzgerald of Michigan, and Hannegan of Indiana (all Democrats), from Free States. to 27 Nays; but the bill being thus returned to the House, the Senate's amendment was thon, and every member present from the Slave States, with Messrs. Cameron, of Pennsylvania; Douglas, of Illinois; Bright, of Indiana; Dickinson, of New York; and Fitzgerald, of Michigan, from Free States--to 21 Nays, including Messrs. Webster, of Massachusetts, Hamlin, of Maine, Dix, of New York, and Breese, of Illinois. The bill,ment, and allowed the bill to become a law in the shape given it by the House. On this memorable division, Messrs. Benton, Bright, Cameron, Dickinson, Douglas, Fitzgerald, Hannegan, Spruance, of Delaware, and Houston, of Texas, voted to yield to the House, leaving none but Senators from Slave States, and not all of them, insistin
's stern campaign, The wreck from forth that iron rain A mournful honor won. Wake, glorious Union--save thy realm! Upon the quicksands strikes thy helm! Thy “morning-star” the storms o'erwhelm-- Thy “talent” buried lies. Wake! by the sullen cannon's roar That tumult bears from shore to shore,-- By HIM Washington. who cannot watch thee more, Save downward from the skies. Antaeus-like, thy sons rebound, Uprising from the ensanguined ground, Unflinching heart and hand — around Shall peal the battle strain; Till Freedom's arm upholds the right, And, Earth renerving for the fight, Thy stars, a meteor through the night, In triumph blaze again. Rise, like the Phoenix from its pyre! Let incense from the urn and lyre, From living bard, from deathless sire, Embalm the banner's fold; Till hushed shall be the trumpet peal, The thunderous clouds where standards reel, The setting sea of serried steel, That from Manassas rolled. Booneville, Missouri. --Fitzgerald's City Item,
A Union man flogged a secessionist in Wyoming, Pa., recently, for expressing treasonable and riotous sentiments. The latter brought the case before a Justice of the Peace, who decided that the flogging was a constitutional act under the circumstances.--Fitzgerald's City Item, May 18.
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 2: early recollections of California--(continued). 1849-1850. (search)
ity with the country, and knowledge of its then condition. At the time, he had on his staff Gibbs as aide-de-camp, and Fitzgerald as quartermaster. He also had along with him quite a retinue of servants, hired with a clear contract to serve him forpted the hospitality offered by Commodore Jones on board the Ohio. I opened the office at the custom-house, and Gibbs, Fitzgerald, and some others of us, slept in the loft of the Hudson Bay Company house until the lower part was cleared of Howard's enial and gentle, and joked at every thing. Poor Mrs. Smith and Mrs. Ogden did not bear it so philosophically. Gibbs, Fitzgerald, and I, could cruise around and find a meal, which cost three dollars, at some of the many restaurants which had sprungd to attempt relief. Major Rucker, who had come across with Pike Graham's Battalion of Dragoons, had exchanged with Major Fitzgerald, of the Quartermaster's Department, and was detailed to conduct this relief. General Smith ordered him to be suppli
ters and artillery. Captain Ross, company D, drove the rebel artillery twice from their position; while Captain Finley, with company A, kept the sharp-shooters of General Churchill at bay. Col. Butler, of the rebel army, was killed here. Col. Fitzgerald, of the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee, led the attack against our left with two regiments of Tennesseeans. He was killed; and the attack being unsuccessful, two more regiments were ordered up under command of General Preston Smith,d Schmidt, Corporals Farrel, (wounded,) Cornell, and Roberts, company B; Sergeants Forbes and Salisbury, and Corporal Vanduzer, (all wounded,) company A; Sergeants Geayer and Stites, Corporals Fields and Stephens, (all wounded,) company C; Sergeants Fitzgerald and Searing, company D; Smith, Henkenson, Jacobson, and Keating, (the latter both wounded,) company E; Riley, River, Connor, (wounded,) company G; Johnson, Byrne, (wounded,) and Hodges, company H; Ross, company I; Color-Sergeant Myers, com
d to outflank us. The One Hundred and Fifty-fourth and Thirteenth Tennessee made the first attack on our left flank; while the three companies, A, F, and D, on the extreme right of the army, were engaged successfully as skirmishers against sharp-shooters and artillery. Captain Ross, company D, drove the rebel artillery twice from their position; while Captain Finley, with company A, kept the sharp-shooters of General Churchill at bay. Col. Butler, of the rebel army, was killed here. Col. Fitzgerald, of the One Hundred and Fifty-fourth Tennessee, led the attack against our left with two regiments of Tennesseeans. He was killed; and the attack being unsuccessful, two more regiments were ordered up under command of General Preston Smith, to defeat our left wing. We gave way after half an hour's fighting against greatly superior numbers, Captains Nation and Wingett, of companies B and G, defending every inch of ground. About this time Adjt. Perry's horse was killed and he wounded;
ed, and his loss is deeply regretted by the regiment. I cannot close this report without calling your especial attention to the good conduct and gallantry of Quartermaster-Sergeant Hannes, (slightly wounded;) Sergeants Dews, Whitney, (wounded,) and Schmidt, Corporals Farrel, (wounded,) Cornell, and Roberts, company B; Sergeants Forbes and Salisbury, and Corporal Vanduzer, (all wounded,) company A; Sergeants Geayer and Stites, Corporals Fields and Stephens, (all wounded,) company C; Sergeants Fitzgerald and Searing, company D; Smith, Henkenson, Jacobson, and Keating, (the latter both wounded,) company E; Riley, River, Connor, (wounded,) company G; Johnson, Byrne, (wounded,) and Hodges, company H; Ross, company I; Color-Sergeant Myers, company C, (wounded;) Color-Corporal Van Cott, company A. I would also call your especial attention to Bugler Horne, who, until wounded sounded the various commands with as much coolness and nonchalance as though on the parade-ground instead of the bat
your obedient servant, Elbert Bland, Lieutenant-Colonel, commanding Seventh South Carolina Regiment. Report of Major Moody. B. G. Humphreys, Colonel commanding Twenty-First Regiment Mississippi Vols.: Sir: In compliance with your order, on the morning of the eleventh December, I took command of the right wing of the Fourth regiment, composed of the following companies: Company A, Lieutenant Walcott; Company C, Lieutenant Longsfield; Company H, Lieutenant Brien; Company F, Captain Fitzgerald; Company G, Captain Dudley; and moved to the support of Captain Govan, of the Seventeenth Mississippi regiment, who was holding the enemy in check at the bridge, at the lower portion of the town. Immediately upon arriving I ordered company G to his support, but found that he had all the men he could use to advantage. This wing remained in line in the road, about one hundred yards in the rear of Captain Govan's position, unprotected, from A. M. to P. M. The dense fog, which had befo
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