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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 93. the burning of Chambersburg. (search)
g before daylight, when McCausland was at Greenawalt's, on the turnpike west of Chambersburg, a most boisterous council was held there, at which there were earnest protests made to McCausland against burning anything but public property. McCausland was greatly incensed at some of his officers, and threatened them with most summary vengeance if they refused to obey orders. Many, however, did openly disobey, and went even so far as to give the ut-most publicity to their disobedience. Captain Fitzhugh exhibited to J. W. Douglas, Esquire, an attorney of this place, a written order with the name of Jubal A. Early to it, directing that Chambersburg should be burned, in retaliation for the burning of six houses in Virginia by Hunter. The burning of Chambersburg was therefore by order of one of the corps commanders of General Lee's army, instead of the work of a guerrilla chief, thus placing the responsibility squarely upon the shoulders of General Lee. We have in support of this the st
the pursuit, followed closely by General Devin's division, composed of General Gibbs' and Colonels Fitzhugh's and Stagg's brigades. The rain had been pouring in torrents for two-days and the roads them, and forcing them to return to Richmond. This conception was at once decided upon and Colonel Fitzhugh's brigade was ordered to proceed to Goochland and beyond, immediately, destroying every loc, reaching Columbia on the evening of the tenth instant, at which place we were rejoined by Colonel Fitzhugh's brigade. Colonel Fitzhugh had destroyed the canal about eight miles east of GoochlandColonel Fitzhugh had destroyed the canal about eight miles east of Goochland, thereby reducing it to a very small length. At Columbia we took one day's rest, and I here sent a communication to the Lieutenant-General commanding the armies, notifying him of our success, positiavalry, Generals Custer and T. C. Devin, division commanders, Generals Gibbs and Wells and Colonels Fitzhugh, Capehart, Stagg, and Pennington, brigade commanders, my staff, and every officer and man
Court-house. It was after dark when the firing ceased, and the enemy lay on their arms that night, not more than one hundred yards in front of our lines. The commands of Generals Devin and Davies reached Dinwiddie Court-house without opposition by way of the Boydton plank-road, but did not participate in the final action of the day. In this well-contested battle the most obstinate gallantry was displayed by my entire command. The brigades commanded by General Gibbs and Colonels Stagg and Fitzhugh, in the First division, Generals Davies, Gregg, and Smith, in the Second division, Colonels Pennington and Capehart, in the Third division, vied with each other in their determined efforts to hold in check the superior force of the enemy; and the skilful management of their troops in this peculiarly difficult country entitles the brigade commanders to the highest commendation. Generals Crook, Merritt, Custer, and Devin, by their courage and ability, sustained their commands, and executed