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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 1 1 Browse Search
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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
ixth Indiana, against an attack made by General Chalmers with a force of about three thousand cavalry, with eight pieces of artillery. He was beaten off, the damage to the road repaired, and we resumed our journey the next day, reaching Corinth at night. I immediately ordered General Blair forward to Iuka, with the First Division, and, as fast as I got troops up, pushed them forward of Bear Creek, the bridge of which was completely destroyed, and an engineer regiment, under command of Colonel Flad, was engaged in its repairs. Quite a considerable force of the enemy was assembled in our front, near Tuscumbia, to resist our advance. It was commanded by General Stephen D. Lee, and composed of Roddy's and Ferguson's brigades, with irregular cavalry, amounting in the aggregate to about five thousand. In person I moved from Corinth to Burnsville on the 18th, and to Iuka on the 19th of October. Osterhaus's division was in the advance, constantly skirmishing with the enemy; he wa
ixty-sixth Indiana, against an attack made by General Chalmers with a force of about three thousand cavalry with eight pieces of artillery. He was beaten off, the damage to the road repaired, and we resumed our journey next day, reaching Corinth at night. I immediately ordered General Blair forward to Iuka with the First division, and as fast as I got troops up pushed them forward of Bear Creek, the bridge of which was completely destroyed, and an engineer regiment, under command of Colonel Flad, engaged in its repair. Quite a considerable force of the enemy was in our front, near Tuscumbia, to resist our advance. It was commanded by General Stephen D. Lee, and composed of Roddy's and Furgeson's brigades, with irregular cavalry, amounting in the aggregate to about five thousand. In person I moved from Corinth to Burnsville on the eighteenth, and to Iuka on the nineteenth of October. Osterihau's division was in the advance, constantly skirmishing with the enemy. It was
he weight i connected to the poise k on the lower beam to act, drawing out the poise until the equilibrium is restored, when the weighted end of the lever falls, re-engaging the wheel; the poise indicating the exact weight equivalent to the force applied. A fly l retards and equalizes the motion of the clock-work. If greater force be then applied, the beam again rises, and the mechanism operates as before, until the crushing or breaking strain is reached. In the machine designed by Colonel Flad, used for testing the stone employed in constructing the St. Louis bridge, the specimen is inserted into two collars, one at each end; one of these has a flat projection supporting a small vertical steel cylinder, which is pressed by a spring against a bar connected to the other collar, so that any compression or elongation of the specimen tends to turn the cylinder around. On its top is a small mirror, which reflects the light of a lamp upon a graduated are concentric with the cylinder.