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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for S. Flagg or search for S. Flagg in all documents.

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tenant-Colonel, C. D. Wolff. (As Colonel Salomon was in command at Springfield at last advices, doubtless the battalion was under the charge of Lieutenant-Colonel Wolff, who has since been reported killed.) Company A--Capt. N. Cole; Company B--Capt. L. G. Gottschalk; Company C-Capt. J. Nemett; Company D-Capt. C. Mehl; Company E-Capt. Richardson; Company F--Capt. Arnaud, M. D.; Company G--Capt. C. E. Stark, M. D.; Company H--Capt. W. J. Hawkins; Company I--Capt. C. Meisner; Company K--Capt. S. Flagg. The balance of the men was composed of regulars, a small body of which bad joined the command previous to the departure from Springfield. New York world's narrative. St. Louis, July 10. Lieut. Tosk, of Col. Siegel's artillery, a veteran soldier, who has seen active service in the Hungarian war, and in the Crimea, arrived here with despatches for Col. Harding, at the arsenal. He was in the engagement at Carthage, and gives the following interesting account of the fight:
ich he had permitted to advance within a few paces of him, supposing it to be the Iowa First. His men scattered considerably, and Col. Salomon's could not be rallied. Consequently Siegel lost five of his guns, the other being brought away by Capt. Flagg, who compelled his prisoners, some sixty in number, to draw the artillery off the field. Our troops took some four hundred horses and about seventy prisoners, and compelled the enemy to burn nearly all of his baggage to keep it from falling is of him, when they poured a murderous fire into his ranks and scattered his men like sheep. The enemy's cannon, also, now began against him, killing the horses attached to his own six pieces, and he was forced to retire leaving them behind. Capt. Flagg, seeing the position of affairs, took ropes, fastened them to one cannon and placed them in the hands of his prisoners, compelling them to draw the cannon off the field. One caisson also was saved, and another tipped into the creek. The othe
ich he had permitted to advance within a few paces of him, supposing it to be the Iowa First. His men scattered considerably, and Col. Salomon's could not be rallied. Consequently Siegel lost five of his guns, the other being brought away by Capt. Flagg, who compelled his prisoners, some sixty in number, to draw the artillery off the field. Our troops took some four hundred horses and about seventy prisoners, and compelled the enemy to burn nearly all of his baggage to keep it from falling is of him, when they poured a murderous fire into his ranks and scattered his men like sheep. The enemy's cannon, also, now began against him, killing the horses attached to his own six pieces, and he was forced to retire leaving them behind. Capt. Flagg, seeing the position of affairs, took ropes, fastened them to one cannon and placed them in the hands of his prisoners, compelling them to draw the cannon off the field. One caisson also was saved, and another tipped into the creek. The othe