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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 5: secession. (search)
ct of treachery greatly incensed them; for the authorities of South Carolina had received a pledge from President Buchanan that the existing military status should undergo no change in their State, during the expiring term of his administration. That pledge was violated by this seizure and military occupation of Sumter; and, notwithstanding all remonstrances, Buchanan, probably under the pressure of Northern clamor, refused to order Anderson back again to Moultrie. The Secretary of War, J. B. Floyd, who had been a party to the promise, felt his honor so compromised by this gross breach of faith, that he instantly and indignantly resigned. Immediately after Mr. Lincoln had entered on his office as President, in March 1861, Commissioners from the South proceeded to Washington, to urge a peaceable separation, and to negotiate for the transfer of Government property, and, in particular, for the removal of the Federal garrison from Forts Pickens and Sumter. But under the pretext that t
educed and passed Fort Henry on the 4th of February, pressing on to Donelson, into and supporting which work, General Johnston had thrown General J. B. Floyd with some ten thousand troops under Pillow and Buckner. After three days hard fighting, Floyd found the position untenable and further resistance impossible. He, therefore, turned over the command to Buckner — who refused to abandon the part of the garrison that could not escape — and, with General Pillow and some five thousand men, withlame of discontent. Mr. Davis soon found himself, from being the idol of the people, with nearly half the country in open opposition to his views. At this moment, perhaps, no one act could have encouraged this feeling more than his relieving Floyd and Pillow from command, for abandoning their posts and leaving a junior officer to capitulate in their stead. Certainly the action of these generals at Donelson was somewhat irregular in a strictly military view. But the people argued that the
e year of jubilee had come. The white men fled, as we approached, leaving their homes at our mercy, which were not molested, except used in some way to benefit the rebel army; in such cases, they were always destroyed. We now struck Beartown Mountain, and then entered Buck Garden, a place of resort, owned principally by Erl Perry, a man of considerable influence among the ignorant. At this place a store was owned by the rebel Colonel Callahan, and in his charge the brother of the thief J. B. Floyd had placed a splendid medical library; the buildings were destroyed, as well as a flour-mill in the same vicinity. Passing through this rich strip to Garden Mountain, Bland County, Virginia, which is well worth a visit in peaceable times, and crossing this, we enter Rich Valley and continue to Walker's Mountain; crossing this, we strike Strong Fork road toward Wytheville, Wy.the County, Virginia, (a place of one thousand eight hundred inhabitants, on the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad;)
C. H., Va., Nov. 15. As I telegraphed you, Floyd retreated the night of the skirmish at Cotton the New River, near Gauley, Nov. 21. Again Floyd has fallen back before our forces, and with thour arms, as we should have bagged his force. Floyd's army is composed of good runners; his artill, if we kept our army in its present position, Floyd would soon be prepared to enforce a retiring oes could reach our camps through the fire that Floyd kept up along the wagon road, except in limite 14th. The following letter, addressed to General Floyd, shows that General Benham has done all in. V. Gen. Benham was within three miles of Floyd's army when the order came giving his command f the expedition was an adventurous pursuit of Floyd, meeting with great success, and worthy of all Richmond, December 10, 1861. Sir: General Floyd's retreat from Cotton Hill, having been rehave not had a correct detailed account of General Floyd's retreat from Cotton Hill, although you m[20 more...]
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
ribe as existing against McClellan is confined to a certain party, and they are in the minority; though being very loud and noisy in their abuse, would seem to be formidable. I don't think they can succeed in their attempts to displace him. I am now very anxious to hear from Fort Donelson. Fort Donelson, twelve miles from Fort Henry, captured February 16, 1862. The Federal forces, under Brigadier-General U. S. Grant and Commodore A. H. Foote, defeated the Confederate troops under General J. B. Floyd. Federal loss, killed, wounded, and missing, 2,832 (O. R.). A reverse there at the present moment would be very unfortunate; and I trust Halleck has arranged matters so as to render success in all human probability certain. The attack has, however, been in progress for four days, which is time enough for it to have fallen, provided it can be carried by assault. Perhaps to-morrow we shall hear something, but the absence of all news to-day is not favorable. We had quite a fall of sn
Oaks, battle of, May 31 to June 1, 1862, I, 271. Falls, Col., I, 302. Farias, Gomez, I, 190. Fassitt, J. B., II, 399. Faulkner, Charles J., II, 274. Featherstone, W. F., I, 287, 290, 292. Felton, Mr., II, 165. Ferrero, Edward, II, 266, 346, 349. Field, Gen., I, 266, 293, 296. Fife, Earl of, II, 254. Fisher, Mr., I, 47. Fisher, Henry, I, 220. Fisher, Joseph W., II, 87. Fisher, Julia, I, 266. Fisher, Rhodes, I, 47. Fitzsimons, Thomas, I, 2, 3. Floyd, J. B., I, 246. Follarde, Major-Gen., I, 365. Foote, A. H., I, 245, 246. Forney, I, 374; II, 145, 161, 248. Fort Donelson, capture of, Feb. 16, 1862, I, 246. Fort Henry, surrender of, Feb. 6, 1862, I, 245. Foster, Senator, II, 264. Frailey, I, 354. Frailey, Capt., II, 234. Franklin, Wm. B., I, 253, 256, 258-260, 275, 277, 281, 282, 284, 285, 293, 297, 328, 329, 334-337, 340, 341, 344-346, 350, 353, 358-362, 364, 365, 367, 382; II, 144, 213, 214, 216. Fredericksburg,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
arshall and Turpin deserve particular mention for their good conduct. Surg. H. R. Green was slightly wounded in the hand by a spent ball while caring for the wounded. The other companies of the Twelfth were not so severely attacked. The loss of the regiment was greater than that of any other Confederate command on the field—6 killed and 37 wounded. Meanwhile the Thirteenth Georgia and Phillips legion had been undergoing the suffering from exposure and fever which the command of Gen. J. B. Floyd had endured in the Gauley valley, and after the return of the expedition against Gauley bridge they were ordered to join General Lee in South Carolina. The First Georgia volunteers, now in Loring's division, and under Stonewall Jackson's command, took part in the Romney expedition which set out from Winchester on January 1, 1862. The morning of that day was as beautiful and mild as May, but before night the weather became very severe. The snow and sleet made it impossible for the loa
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
days before the Battle of Carnifax Ferry. General Floyd anticipated an engagement with the enemy aeption. It is proper to state just here, that Floyd's command did not exceed nineteen hundred avai the reported reinforcements of the enemy, General Floyd very wisely ordered a retreat as quietly aing these orders, and were soon on the march. Floyd's command fell back to Meadow Bluff, which con. In a day or two after this occurrence General Floyd's command was ordered to Cotton Mountain, probably a hundred miles distant. Floyd's command was now reinforced, and consisted of the followinus, though did no damage. In a day or two General Floyd ordered a piece of cannon from my battery ch surprised and disappointed in not capturing Floyd and his command, and was astonished at the sucting in very small loss on either side. General Floyd continued his march to Raleigh Courthouse,llowed us a short distance from McCoy's Mill. Floyd continued to fall back several miles the other[12 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Floyd's operations in West Virginia in 1861. (search)
days before the Battle of Carnifax Ferry. General Floyd anticipated an engagement with the enemy aand very eager for the conflict. Upon forming Floyd's brigade, our battery was at once placed in peption. It is proper to state just here, that Floyd's command did not exceed nineteen hundred avai the reported reinforcements of the enemy, General Floyd very wisely ordered a retreat as quietly aing these orders, and were soon on the march. Floyd's command fell back to Meadow Bluff, which conall in sight. About the 1st of October, General Floyd was ordered to reinforce General Wise at L in an open field. It is believed that if General Floyd's command had been an hour later in leavine in the vicinity of the Courthouse just after Floyd left. It was said that the General commandingch surprised and disappointed in not capturing Floyd and his command, and was astonished at the sucting in very small loss on either side. General Floyd continued his march to Raleigh Courthouse,[12 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Semmes' Georgia Brigade. (search)
eth Georgia Regiment. N.-C. Staff. Ord. Sergeant E. L. Culberson. Co. A. Sergeant M. F. Murrah, Corporal J. H. Sheppard, Mus'n R. A. Adcock, Private J. T. Brazell, W. P. Brooks, T. M. Tolds, N. Griffin, J. J. Haney, J. M. Heard, Private E. D. Hines, G. W. Key, J. H. Madden, A. Meaddows, C. P. Murrah, R. H. McCalla, H. H. Lee, E. D. Smith. Co. B. Sergeant J. F. Watts, Private P. B. Bowles, J. O. Cleaveland, E. P. Cleaveland, J. D. Fuller, A. J. Fuller, J. B. Floyd, B. M. Gates, A. J. Greeys, Private A. E. Hicks, T. T. Marsh, J. D. Malbary, W. H. O'Neil, J. J. Smith, M. McGhee, James O'Neil, R. A. White, J. B. Campbell. Co. C. Private J. W. Kirkis, Private C. H. Ellis. Co. D. Sergeant J. M. Stroup, F. A. Christian, Private W. F. Brombalow, T. H. Bowen, Private W. C Hardy, D. L. Potts, W. M. Thomas, T. H. Dean. Co. E. 1st Sergeant P. H. Teasley, Sergeant J. G. Smith, Mus'n H. K. Bruce, Private J. L. Beck, Priva
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