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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 19 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Declaration of Independence. (search)
y pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor. Signed by order and in behalf of the Congress. John Hancock, President. Attested, Charles Thompson, Secretary. New Hampshire. Josiah Bartlett, William Whipple, Matthew Thornton. Massachusetts Bay. Samuel Adams, John Adams, Robert Treat Paine, Elbridge Gerry. Rhode Island, Etc. Stephen Hopkins, William Ellery. Connecticut. Roger Sherman, Samuel Huntington, William Williams, Oliver Wolcott. New York. William Floyd, Philip Livingston, Francis Lewis, Lewis Morris. New Jersey. Richard Stockton, John Witherspoon, Francis Hopkinson, John Hart, Abraham Clark. North Carolina. William Hooper, Joseph Hewes, John Penn. Georgia. Button Gwinnett, Lyman Hall, George Walton. Pennsylvania. Robert Morris, Benjamin Rush, Benjamiin Franklin, John Morton, George Clymer, James Smith, George Taylor, William Paca, George Ross. Delaware. Caesar Rodney, George Read, Thomas McKean. Maryland. Samu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fort Donelson, (search)
ing the attack. General Pillow was in command of the fort; but, on the morning of the 13th, General Floyd arrived from Virginia with some troops and superseded him. They were assisted by Gen. Simon closely held by Grant, the question, How shall we escape? was a paramount one in the minds of Floyd and Pillow. At midnight the three Confederate commanders held a private council, when it was concluded that the garrison must surrender. I cannot surrender, said Floyd; you know my position with the Federals; it won't do, it won't do. Pillow said, I will not surrender myself nor my command; I will die first. Then, said Buckner, coolly, the surrender will devolve on me. Then Floyd said, General, if you are put in command, will you allow me to take out, by the river, my brigade? If you will move before I surrender, Buckner replied. Floyd offered to surrender the command, first, to Pillow, who replied, I will not accept it—I will never surrender. Buckner said, like a true soldier
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Floyd, William 1734-1821 (search)
Floyd, William 1734-1821 Signer of the Declaration of Independence; born in Brookhaven, Suffolk co., N. Y., Dec. 17, 1734; took an early and vigorous part in the Revolution; was a member of the New York committee of correspondence; and a member of the first Continental Congress in 1774, and until 1777. He was again a member after October, 1778. He was a State Senator in 1777. During the occupation of Long Island by the British, for nearly seven years, his family were in exile. He held te was again a member after October, 1778. He was a State Senator in 1777. During the occupation of Long Island by the British, for nearly seven years, his family were in exile. He held the commission of brigadier-general, and commanded the Suffolk county militia in repelling an invasion of Long Island by the British. General Floyd was a member of the first national Congress, and as Presidential elector gave his vote for Jefferson in 1801. He died in Weston, Oneida co., N. Y., Aug. 4, 1821.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gardner, John Lane 1793-1869 (search)
Gardner, John Lane 1793-1869 Military officer; born in Boston, Mass., Aug. 1, 1793; took part in the War of 1812 as lieutenant of infantry; was also in the war with the Seminoles in Florida and in the Mexican War, where he received brevets for gallant conduct at the battles of Cerro Gordo and Contreras. He was in command at Charleston when South Carolina seceded, but was relieved from his command by order of Secretary Floyd. He was succeeded in the command of Fort Moultrie by Maj. Robert Anderson. He died in Wilmington, Del., Feb. 19, 1869. See Moultrie,. Fort.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
7, 1774 4. John Adams 5. Samuel Adams 6. Robert Treat Paine 7. Hon. Stephen HopkinsRhode Island and Providence PlantationsAug. 10, 1774 8. Hon. Samuel Ward 9. Hon. Eliphalet DyerConnecticutJuly 13, 1774 10. Hon. Roger Sherman 11. Silas Deane 12. James DuaneCity and county of New York, and other counties in province of New York.July 28, 1774 13. Philip Livingston 14. John Jay 15. Isaac Low 16. John Alsop 17. John Herring 18. Simon Boerum 19. Henry Wisuer 20. Col. William FloydCounty of Suffolk in province of New York.July 28, 1774 Delegates to the first Continental Congress—Continued. Delegates.State Represented.Credentials Signed. 21. James KinseyNew JerseyJuly 23, 1774 22. John De Hart 23. Richard Smith 24. William Livingston 25. Stephen Crane 26. Hon. Joseph GallowayPennsylvaniaJuly 22, 1774 27. Samuel Rhodes 28. Thomas Mifflin 29. John Morton 30. Charles Humphreys 31. Edward Biddle 32. George Ross 33. John Dickinson 34. H
"In a Horn." --Wm. Floyd and Wm. Swift were found on yesterday evening, by some of the Provost guard, on the lower end of Main street, engaged in a charivari. They were "winding the mellow horn" at such a rate that the corporal of the guard, who, though he has a good deal of "music in his soul." could not stand the discord of vile sounds, and marched them off, with the unlucky horn, to the watch-house. They found they had a horn too much, and no mistake. The Provost Marshal intends to investigate the source of their supply of mellowing fluid.
Deserters returned. --Eight men applied to the Adjutant General of the State, on yesterday, for the purpose of enlisting in Floyd's Division. Upon investigation, it was found that they were not exempt from conscript duty, and furthermore, were already in the service, and had run away from their regiments. They were sent to the Provost Marshal.